yielding

UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈjiːldɪŋ/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/ˈyildɪŋ/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(yēlding)



WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
yield•ing /ˈyildɪŋ/USA pronunciation   adj. 
  1. submissive;
    giving in easily or readily;
    compliant.
  2. tending to give way, esp. under pressure;
    flexible.
  3. Agriculture(of a crop, soil, etc.) producing a yield;
    productive.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
yield•ing  (yēlding),USA pronunciation adj. 
  1. inclined to give in;
    submissive;
    compliant:a timid, yielding man.
  2. tending to give way, esp. under pressure;
    flexible;
    supple;
    pliable:a yielding mattress.
  3. Agriculture(of a crop, soil, etc.) producing a yield;
    productive.
yielding•ly, adv. 
yielding•ness, n. 
  • 1300–50; Middle English: owing; see yield, -ing2

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
yielding /ˈjiːldɪŋ/ adj
  1. compliant, submissive, or flexible
  2. pliable or soft: a yielding material
WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
yield /yild/USA pronunciation   v. 
  1. Agriculture[+ object] to give forth or produce by a natural process or after cultivation:to yield 40 bushels to the acre.
  2. Business[+ object] to produce or furnish (profit).
  3. to give up, as to superior power or authority: [+ object]The army yielded the fort to the enemy.[no object]to yield to the enemy.
  4. to give over;
    to give over control to: [+ object]I yield the floor to my esteemed colleague, the senator from Ohio (= I give up my right to speak, in favor of hers).[no object]I yield to the senator from Ohio.
  5. to give way to force, pressure, etc.;
    collapse:[no object]He pushed against the door and it yielded slightly.

n. [countable]
  1. the act of yielding or producing.
  2. the quantity or amount yielded or produced:a low yield on crop production.
  3. Businessthe income produced by a financial investment, usually given as a percentage of cost:a low yield on tax-exempt bonds.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
yield (yēld),USA pronunciation  v.t. 
  1. Agricultureto give forth or produce by a natural process or in return for cultivation:This farm yields enough fruit to meet all our needs.
  2. Businessto produce or furnish (payment, profit, or interest):a trust fund that yields ten percent interest annually; That investment will yield a handsome return.
  3. to give up, as to superior power or authority:They yielded the fort to the enemy.
  4. to give up or surrender (oneself ):He yielded himself to temptation.
  5. to give up or over;
    relinquish or resign:to yield the floor to the senator from Ohio.
  6. to give as due or required:to yield obedience.
  7. to cause;
    give rise to:The play yielded only one good laugh.

v.i. 
  1. to give a return, as for labor expended;
    produce;
    bear.
  2. to surrender or submit, as to superior power:The rebels yielded after a week.
  3. to give way to influence, entreaty, argument, or the like:Don't yield to their outrageous demands.
  4. to give place or precedence (usually fol. by to):to yield to another; Will the senator from New York yield?
  5. to give way to force, pressure, etc., so as to move, bend, collapse, or the like.

n. 
  1. the act of yielding or producing.
  2. something yielded.
  3. the quantity or amount yielded.
  4. Chemistrythe quantity of product formed by the interaction of two or more substances, generally expressed as a percentage of the quantity obtained to that theoretically obtainable.
  5. Businessthe income produced by a financial investment, usually shown as a percentage of cost.
  6. Physicsa measure of the destructive energy of a nuclear explosion, expressed in kilotons of the amount of TNT that would produce the same destruction.
yielder, n. 
  • bef. 900; (verb, verbal) Middle English y(i)elden, Old English g(i)eldan to pay; cognate with German gelten to be worth, apply to; (noun, nominal) late Middle English, derivative of the verb, verbal
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged furnish, supply, render, bear.
    • 3.See corresponding entry in Unabridged abandon, abdicate, waive, forgo.
      Yield, submit, surrender mean to give way or give up to someone or something. To
      yield is to concede under some degree of pressure, but not necessarily to surrender totally:to yield ground to an enemy.To
      submit is to give up more completely to authority, superior force, etc., and to cease opposition, although usually with reluctance:to submit to control.To
      surrender is to give up complete possession of, relinquish, and cease claim to:to surrender a fortress, one's freedom, rights.
    • 6.See corresponding entry in Unabridged render.
    • 10.See corresponding entry in Unabridged give in, comply, bow.
    • 14.See corresponding entry in Unabridged fruit. See  crop. 
    • 4.See corresponding entry in Unabridged resist.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
yield /jiːld/ vb
  1. to give forth or supply (a product, result, etc), esp by cultivation, labour, etc; produce or bear
  2. (transitive) to furnish as a return: the shares yielded three per cent
  3. (transitive) often followed by up: to surrender or relinquish, esp as a result of force, persuasion, etc
  4. (intransitive) sometimes followed by to: to give way, submit, or surrender, as through force or persuasion: she yielded to his superior knowledge
  5. (intransitive) often followed by to: to agree; comply; assent: he eventually yielded to their request for money
  6. (transitive) to grant or allow; concede: to yield right of way
n
  1. the result, product, or amount yielded
  2. the profit or return, as from an investment or tax
  3. the annual income provided by an investment, usually expressed as a percentage of its cost or of its current value
  4. the energy released by the explosion of a nuclear weapon expressed in terms of the amount of TNT necessary to produce the same energy
  5. the quantity of a specified product obtained in a reaction or series of reactions, usually expressed as a percentage of the quantity that is theoretically obtainable
Etymology: Old English gieldan; related to Old Frisian jelda, Old High German geltan, Old Norse gjalda, Gothic gildan

ˈyieldable adj ˈyielder n
'yielding' also found in these entries:
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