sum

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈsʊm/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/sʌm/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(sum)


Inflections of 'sum' (v): (⇒ conjugate)
sums
v 3rd person singular
summing
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."
summed
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed."
summed
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
sum /sʌm/USA pronunciation   n., v.,  summed, sum•ming. 
n. [countable]
  1. Mathematicsthe total of two or more numbers, amounts, or quantities, determined by or as if by addition:The sum of 6 and 8 is 14.
  2. an amount or quantity, esp. of money:to lend small sums.
  3. Mathematicsa series of numbers or quantities to be added up.
  4. the full amount, or the whole:the sum of our knowledge.
  5. the main idea, gist, or point:the sum and substance of his argument.

v. 
  1. Mathematics[+ object] to figure out the sum of, as by addition.
  2. sum up: 
    • to express in a brief yet complete statement;
      summarize: [+ up + object]He summed up the main points of the speech.[+ object + up]Can you sum it all up in just a few words?[no object]ready to sum up at last after a long speech.
    • to form a quick estimate or judgment of: [+ up + object]quickly summed up the situation.[+ object + up]She summed him up in a minute.
Idioms
  1. Idiomsin sum, in brief but complete form:In sum, the government believes it knows what it is doing.


-sum-, root. 
  1. -sum- comes from Latin, where it has the meaning "take up;
    pick up.'' This meaning is found in such words as: assume, consume, consumption, presume, presumption, resume, resumé, resumption, subsume.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
sum (sum),USA pronunciation  n., v.,  summed, sum•ming. 

n. 
  1. Mathematicsthe aggregate of two or more numbers, magnitudes, quantities, or particulars as determined by or as if by the mathematical process of addition:The sum of 6 and 8 is 14.
  2. a particular aggregate or total, esp. with reference to money:The expenses came to an enormous sum.
  3. an indefinite amount or quantity, esp. of money:to lend small sums.
  4. Mathematicsa series of numbers or quantities to be added up.
  5. Mathematicsan arithmetical problem to be solved, or such a problem worked out and having the various steps shown.
  6. the full amount, or the whole.
  7. the substance or gist of a matter, comprehensively or broadly viewed or expressed:the sum of his opinions.
  8. concise or brief form:in sum.
  9. Mathematics
    • the limit of the sequence of partial sums of a given infinite series.
    • union (def. 10a).
  10. a summary.

v.t. 
  1. to combine into an aggregate or total (often fol. by up).
  2. Mathematicsto ascertain the sum of, as by addition.
  3. to bring into or contain in a small compass (often fol. by up).

v.i. 
  1. to amount (usually fol. by to or into):Their expenses summed into the thousands.
  2. sum up: 
    • to reckon:We summed up our assets and liabilities.
    • to bring into or contain in a brief and comprehensive statement;
      summarize:to sum up the case for the prosecution.
    • to form a quick estimate of:I summed him up in a minute.
sumless, adj. 
sumless•ness, n. 
  • Medieval Latin summāre, derivative of summa
  • Old French summer)
  • Latin summa sum, noun, nominal use of feminine of summus highest, superlative of superus (see superior); (verb, verbal) Middle English summen (
  • (noun, nominal) Middle English summe 1250–1300
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged See  number. 

sum-, 
  • var. of  sub- before m: summon.

  • SUM, 
  • Militarysurface-to-underwater missile.

  • Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
    sum /sʌm/ n
    1. the result of the addition of numbers, quantities, objects, etc
    2. one or more columns or rows of numbers to be added, subtracted, multiplied, or divided
    3. the limit of a series of sums of the first n terms of a converging infinite series as n tends to infinity
    4. a quantity, esp of money: he borrows enormous sums
    5. the essence or gist of a matter (esp in the phrases in sum, in sum and substance)
    6. a less common word for summary
    7. (modifier) complete or final (esp in the phrase sum total)
    vb (sums, summing, summed)
    1. (often followed by up) to add or form a total of (something)
    2. (transitive) to calculate the sum of (the terms in a sequence)

    See also sum upEtymology: 13th Century summe, from Old French, from Latin summa the top, sum, from summus highest, from superus in a higher position; see super
    'sum' also found in these entries:
    Collocations: a lump sum payment, spent a tidy sum on this [house, car, suit], made a tidy sum on the [scheme, project], more...

    Forum discussions with the word(s) "sum" in the title:


    Look up "sum" at Merriam-Webster
    Look up "sum" at dictionary.com

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