rumble

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈrʌmbəl/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/ˈrʌmbəl/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(rumbəl)

Inflections of 'rumble' (v): (⇒ conjugate)
rumbles
v 3rd person singular
rumbling
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."
rumbled
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed."
rumbled
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
rum•ble /ˈrʌmbəl/USA pronunciation   v.,  -bled, -bling, n. 
v. 
  1. to make a deep, rolling and continuous sound, such as thunder:[no object]The thunder rumbled in the distance. His stomach rumbled from hunger.
  2. to move or travel with such a sound:[no object]The heavy planes rumbled down the runway.
  3. to say or give out with a rumbling sound: [no object]rumbling about the high price of gas.[used with quotations]"Just a minute, just a minute,'' he rumbled.
  4. Slang Terms[no object]to take part in a street fight between teenage gangs.

n. [countable]
  1. a rumbling sound.
  2. Slang Termsa street fight between teenage gangs.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
rum•ble  (rumbəl),USA pronunciation v.,  -bled, -bling, n. 
v.i. 
  1. to make a deep, heavy, somewhat muffled, continuous sound, as thunder.
  2. to move or travel with such a sound:The train rumbled on.
  3. Slang Termsto have or take part in a street fight between or among teenage gangs:Rival gangs rumbled on Saturday afternoon.

v.t. 
  1. to give forth or utter with a rumbling sound:to rumble a command.
  2. to cause to make or move with a rumbling sound:to rumble a wagon over the ground.
  3. to subject to the action of a rumble or tumbling box, as for the purpose of polishing.

n. 
  1. a deep, heavy, somewhat muffled, continuous sound:the rumble of tanks across a bridge.
  2. TransportSee  rumble seat. 
  3. Transporta rear part of a carriage containing seating accommodations, as for servants, or space for baggage.
  4. Mechanical EngineeringSee  tumbling box. 
  5. Slang Termsa street fight between rival teenage gangs.
rumbler, n. 
rumbling•ly, adv. 
  • 1325–75; 1940–45 for def. 3; (verb, verbal) Middle English romblen, rumblen; compare Dutch rommelen, probably of imitative origin, originally; (noun, nominal) Middle English, derivative of the verb, verbal
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged roar, thunder, roll, boom.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
rumble /ˈrʌmbəl/ vb
  1. to make or cause to make a deep resonant sound: thunder rumbled in the sky
  2. to move with such a sound: the train rumbled along
  3. (transitive) to utter with a rumbling sound: he rumbled an order
  4. (transitive) Brit informal to find out about (someone or something); discover (something): the police rumbled their plans
  5. (intransitive) US slang to be involved in a gang fight
n
  1. a deep resonant sound
  2. a widespread murmur of discontent
  3. US Canadian NZ slang a gang fight
Etymology: 14th Century: perhaps from Middle Dutch rummelen; related to German rummeln, rumpeln

ˈrumbler n ˈrumbling adj
'rumble' also found in these entries:
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