repel

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/rɪˈpɛl/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/rɪˈpɛl/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(ri pel)

Inflections of 'repel' (v): (⇒ conjugate)
repels
v 3rd person singular
repelling
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."
repelled
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed."
repelled
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
re•pel /rɪˈpɛl/USA pronunciation   v. [+ object],  -pelled, -pel•ling. 
  1. to drive or force back (an assailant, invader, etc.):The army repelled the last invasion.
  2. to fail to mix with:Water and oil repel each other.
  3. to resist the absorption of:This coat repels rain.
  4. to cause a feeling of distaste or dislike:She was repelled by his bad manners.
  5. to push away by a force (opposed to attract ):The north pole of one magnet will repel the north pole of another.
See -pel-.
WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
re•pel  (ri pel),USA pronunciation v.,  -pelled, -pel•ling. 
v.t. 
  1. to drive or force back (an assailant, invader, etc.).
  2. to thrust back or away.
  3. to resist effectively (an attack, onslaught, etc.).
  4. to keep off or out;
    fail to mix with:Water and oil repel each other.
  5. to resist the absorption or passage of (water or other liquid):This coat repels rain.
  6. to refuse to have to do with;
    resist involvement in:to repel temptation.
  7. to refuse to accept or admit;
    reject:to repel a suggestion.
  8. to discourage the advances of (a person):He repelled me with his harshness.
  9. to cause distaste or aversion in:Their untidy appearance repelled us.
  10. to push back or away by a force, as one body acting upon another (opposed to attract):The north pole of one magnet will repel the north pole of another.

v.i. 
  1. to act with a force that drives or keeps away something.
  2. to cause distaste or aversion.
re•pellence, re•pellen•cy, n. 
re•peller, n. 
re•pelling•ly, adv. 
re•pelling•ness, n. 
  • Latin repellere to drive back, equivalent. to re- re- + pellere to drive, push; see repulse
  • Middle English repellen 1350–1400
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged repulse, parry, ward off.
    • 3.See corresponding entry in Unabridged withstand, oppose, rebuff.
    • 7.See corresponding entry in Unabridged decline, rebuff.
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged attract.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
repel /rɪˈpɛl/ vb ( -pels, -pelling, -pelled)(mainly tr)
  1. to force or drive back (something or somebody, esp an attacker)
  2. (also intr) to produce a feeling of aversion or distaste in (someone or something); be disgusting (to)
  3. to be effective in keeping away, controlling, or resisting: an aerosol spray that repels flies
  4. to have no affinity for; fail to mix with or absorb: water and oil repel each other
  5. to disdain to accept (something); turn away from or spurn: she repelled his advances
Etymology: 15th Century: from Latin repellere, from re- + pellere to push, drive

reˈpeller n USAGE
repulse

'repel' also found in these entries:
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