pied

UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/paɪd/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/paɪd/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(pīd)

From the verb pi: (⇒ conjugate)
pied is: Click the infinitive to see all available inflections
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed."
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
pied /paɪd/USA pronunciation   adj. 
  1. Zoologyhaving two or more colors in a pattern of patches or spots;
    piebald.
  2. wearing pied clothing.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
pied  (pīd),USA pronunciation adj. 
  1. Zoologyhaving patches of two or more colors, as various birds and other animals:a pied horse.
  2. wearing pied clothing.
  • 1350–1400; Middle English; pie2 (with reference to the black and white plumage of the magpie) + -ed3

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
pied /paɪd/ adj
  1. having markings of two or more colours
Etymology: 14th Century: from pie²; an allusion to the magpie's black-and-white colouring
WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
pi1 /paɪ/USA pronunciation   n.[countable]pl.  pis. 
  1. Linguisticsthe 16th letter of the Greek alphabet (&Pgr;
    , π).
  2. Mathematics
    • the letter π, used as the symbol for the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter.
    • the ratio itself, a number usually given as 3.141592+.

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
pie1 /paɪ/USA pronunciation   n. 
  1. Fooda crust of baked dough, filled with fruit, pudding, etc.: [countable]an apple pie.[uncountable]had apple pie for dessert.
  2. Fooda layer cake with a cream or custard filling: [countable]a Boston cream pie.[uncountable]Our desserts include lemon meringue pie and Boston cream pie.
  3. a total or whole that can be divided:[countable]They want a bigger piece of the pie.
  4. an activity or affair:[countable]I'm sure he had a finger in the pie.
Idioms
  1. Idiomseasy as pie, extremely easy or simple:Stealing the money was easy as pie.
  2. Idiomspie in the sky, [uncountable] a plan, suggestion, idea, or belief about something not likely to come true:His new tax plan is just pie in the sky.


WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
pi1  (pī),USA pronunciation n., pl.  pis. 
  1. Linguisticsthe 16th letter of the Greek alphabet (II, π).
  2. Linguisticsthe consonant sound represented by this letter.
  3. Mathematics
    • the letter π, used as the symbol for the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter.
    • the ratio itself: 3.141592+.
  • Greek pî, peî; used in mathematics to represent Greek periphérion periphery
  • 1835–45

pi2  (pī),USA pronunciation n., pl.  pies, v.,  pied, pi•ing. 
n. 
  1. Printingprinting types mixed together indiscriminately.
  2. any confused mixture;
    jumble.

v.t. 
  1. Printingto reduce (printing types) to a state of confusion.
  2. to jumble.
Also,  pie. 
  • origin, originally uncertain 1650–60

PI, 
  1. Lawpersonal injury.
  2. principal investigator.
  3. private investigator.

Pi., 
  • piaster.
  • Also,  pi. 
    P.I., 
    1. Place NamesPhilippine Islands.
    2. Also,  p.i. private investigator.

    WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
    pie1  (pī),USA pronunciation n. 
    1. Fooda baked food having a filling of fruit, meat, pudding, etc., prepared in a pastry-lined pan or dish and often topped with a pastry crust:apple pie; meat pie.
    2. Fooda layer cake with a filling of custard, cream jelly, or the like:chocolate cream pie.
    3. a total or whole that can be divided:They want a bigger part of the profit pie.
    4. an activity or affair:He has his finger in the political pie too.
    5. Foodpizza.
    6. Idiomseasy as pie, extremely easy or simple.
    7. Idiomsnice as pie, extremely well-behaved, agreeable, or the like:The children were nice as pie.
    8. pie in the sky: 
      • Idiomsthe illusory prospect of future benefits:Political promises are often pie in the sky.
      • Idiomsa state of perfect happiness;
        utopia:to promise pie in the sky.
    pielike′, adj. 
    • Middle English, of obscure origin, originally 1275–1325

    pie2  (pī),USA pronunciation n. 
    1. Birdsmagpie.
    • Latin pīca, akin to pīcus woodpecker
    • Old French
    • Middle English 1200–50

    pie3  (pī),USA pronunciation n., v.t.,  pied, pie•ing. 
    1. Printingpi2.

    pie4  (pī),USA pronunciation n. 
    1. Religion(in England before the Reformation) a book of ecclesiastical rules for finding the particulars of the service for the day.
    Also,  pye. 
    • 1470–80; translation of Latin pīca pie2; the allusion is obscure; compare pica1

    pie5  (pī),USA pronunciation n. 
    1. Currencya former bronze coin of India, the 12th part of an anna. Cf.  naya paisa, paisa, pice. 
    • Marathi pā'ī literally, a fourth
    • 1855–60

    PIE, 
  • Language VarietiesProto-Indo-European.

  • Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
    pi /paɪ/ n ( pl pis)
    1. the 16th letter in the Greek alphabet (Π, π), a consonant, transliterated as p
    2. a transcendental number, fundamental to mathematics, that is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. Approximate value: 3.141 592…; symbol: π
    Etymology: 18th Century (mathematical use): representing the first letter of Greek periphereia periphery
    pi, pie /paɪ/ n ( pl pies)
    1. a jumbled pile of printer's type
    2. a jumbled mixture
    vb (pies, piing, pied, pies, pieing, pied)(transitive)
    1. to spill and mix (set type) indiscriminately
    2. to mix up
    Etymology: 17th Century: of uncertain origin
    pi /paɪ/ adj
    1. Brit slang
      short for pious,
    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
    pie /paɪ/ n
    1. a baked food consisting of a sweet or savoury filling in a pastry-lined dish, often covered with a pastry crust
    2. pie in the skyillusory hope or promise of some future good; false optimism
    Etymology: 14th Century: of obscure origin
    pie /paɪ/ n
    1. an archaic or dialect name for magpie
    Etymology: 13th Century: via Old French from Latin pīca magpie; related to Latin pīcus woodpecker
    pie /paɪ/ n , vb
    1. a variant spelling of pi2
    'pied' also found in these entries (note: many are not synonyms or translations):
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