leak

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈliːk/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/lik/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(lēk)



WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
leak /lik/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. an unintended hole, crack, or the like, through which liquid, gas, light, etc., enters or escapes:a leak in the roof.
  2. a spreading or release of secret information by an unnamed source:a leak to the press about his role in the conspiracy.

v. 
  1. to let a liquid, gas, light, etc., enter or escape, as through a hole or crack:[no object]The boat leaks.
  2. to (cause to) pass in or out in this manner, as liquid, gas, or light: [no object]Gas was leaking from a pipe.[+ object]The brakes are leaking fluid.
  3. to (cause or allow to) become known: [no object]The news leaked to the public.[+ object]Who leaked that story to the press?
Idioms
  1. Idiomstake a leak, Slang (vulgar ). to urinate.

leak•y, adj.,  -i•er, -i•est. 

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
leak  (lēk),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. an unintended hole, crack, or the like, through which liquid, gas, light, etc., enters or escapes:a leak in the roof.
  2. an act or instance of leaking.
  3. any means of unintended entrance or escape.
  4. Electricitythe loss of current from a conductor, usually resulting from poor insulation.
  5. a disclosure of secret, esp. official, information, as to the news media, by an unnamed source.
  6. take a leak, Slang (vulgar). to urinate.

v.i. 
  1. to let a liquid, gas, light, etc., enter or escape, as through an unintended hole or crack:The boat leaks.
  2. to pass in or out in this manner, as liquid, gas, or light:gas leaking from a pipe.
  3. to become known unintentionally (usually fol. by out):The news leaked out.
  4. to disclose secret, esp. official, information anonymously, as to the news media:The official revealed that he had leaked to the press in the hope of saving his own reputation.

v.t. 
  1. to let (liquid, gas, light, etc.) enter or escape:This camera leaks light.
  2. to allow to become known, as information given out covertly:to leak the news of the ambassador's visit.
leaker, n. 
leakless, adj. 
  • Old Norse leka to drip, leak; akin to Dutch lek, obsolete German lech leaky. See leach1
  • 1375–1425; 1955–60 for def. 12; late Middle English leken

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
leak /liːk/ n
  1. a crack, hole, etc, that allows the accidental escape or entrance of fluid, light, etc
  2. such escaping or entering fluid, light, etc
  3. spring a leakto develop a leak
  4. something resembling this in effect: a leak in the defence system
  5. the loss of current from an electrical conductor because of faulty insulation, etc
  6. a disclosure, often intentional, of secret information
  7. the act or an instance of leaking
  8. a slang word for urination
    See urination
vb
  1. to enter or escape or allow to enter or escape through a crack, hole, etc
  2. when intr, often followed by out: to disclose (secret information), often intentionally, or (of secret information) to be disclosed
  3. (intransitive)
    a slang word for urinate
Etymology: 15th Century: from Scandinavian; compare Old Norse leka to drip

ˈleaker n
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