latitude

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈlætɪtjuːd/

US:USA pronuncation: IPAUSA pronuncation: IPA/ˈlætɪˌtud, -ˌtyud/

US:USA pronunciation: respellingUSA pronunciation: respelling(lati to̅o̅d′, -tyo̅o̅d′)




WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
lat•i•tude /ˈlætɪˌtud, -ˌtyud/USA pronunciation   n. 
  1. Geography
    • the angular distance, measured north or south from the equator, of a point on the earth's surface, expressed in degrees: [uncountable]at twenty degrees latitude.[countable;  usually singular]drifting at a latitude of fifteen degrees.
    • [plural] a place or region as marked by this distance:at tropical latitudes.
  2. freedom from narrow restrictions;
    freedom of action, opinion, etc.:[uncountable]They allow their children plenty of latitude in choosing friends.
See -lat-2.
WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
lat•i•tude  (lati to̅o̅d′, -tyo̅o̅d′),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. Geography
    • the angular distance north or south from the equator of a point on the earth's surface, measured on the meridian of the point.
    • a place or region as marked by this distance.
  2. freedom from narrow restrictions;
    freedom of action, opinion, etc.:He allowed his children a fair amount of latitude.
  3. Astronomy
    • See  celestial latitude. 
    • See  galactic latitude. 
  4. Photographythe ability of an emulsion to record the brightness values of a subject in their true proportion to one another, expressed as the ratio of the amount of brightness in the darkest possible value to the amount of brightness in the brightest:a latitude of 1 to 128.
  • Latin lātitūdō breadth, equivalent. to lāt(us) broad + -i- -i- + -tūdō -tude
  • Middle English 1350–1400
    • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged extent, liberty, indulgence. See  range. 

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
latitude /ˈlætɪˌtjuːd/ n
  1. an angular distance in degrees north or south of the equator (latitude 0°), equal to the angle subtended at the centre of the globe by the meridian between the equator and the point in question
  2. (often plural) a region considered with regard to its distance from the equator
  3. scope for freedom of action, thought, etc; freedom from restriction: his parents gave him a great deal of latitude
Etymology: 14th Century: from Latin lātitūdō, from lātus broad

ˌlatiˈtudinal adj ˌlatiˈtudinally adv
'latitude' also found in these entries:
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