jerk

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈdʒ3ːrk/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/dʒɝk/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling( jûrk)



WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
jerk1 /dʒɜrk/USA pronunciation   n. 
    [countable]
  1. a quick, sharp pull, push, twist, throw, or the like;
    sudden movement:The train started with a jerk.
  2. Physiologya sudden movement of a muscle, esp. when involuntary.
  3. Slang Termsa foolish, stupid person;
    an idiot;
    a dope.

v. 
  1. to pull, twist, move, push, or throw with a quick, sudden motion:[+ object]She jerked the child by the hand.
  2. to move with a quick, sharp motion, as if uncontrolled:[no object]His arms and legs jerked in spasm.
  3. Informal Termsto prepare and serve (sodas, ice cream, etc.) at a soda fountain:[+ object]He jerked sodas for a few years.
  4. jerk off, [no object] Slang (vulgar ). to masturbate.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
jerk1  ( jûrk),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. a quick, sharp pull, thrust, twist, throw, or the like;
    a sudden movement:The train started with a jerk.
  2. Physiologya spasmodic, usually involuntary, muscular movement, as the reflex action of pulling the hand away from a flame.
  3. any sudden, quick movement of the body, as in dodging something.
  4. Slang Termsa contemptibly naive, fatuous, foolish, or inconsequential person.
  5. Sport(in weightlifting) the raising of a weight from shoulder height to above the head by straightening the arms.
  6. British Termsjerks, See  physical jerks. 
  7. Music and Dancea dance, deriving from the twist, in which the dancers alternately thrust out their pelvises and their shoulders.
  8. the jerks, paroxysms or violent spasmodic muscular movements, as resulting from excitement evoked by some religious services.

v.t. 
  1. to pull, twist, move, thrust, or throw with a quick, suddenly arrested motion:She jerked the child by the hand.
  2. to utter in a broken, spasmodic way.
  3. Informal Termsto prepare, dispense, and serve (sodas, ice cream, etc.) at a soda fountain.

v.i. 
  1. to give a jerk or jerks.
  2. to move with a quick, sharp motion;
    move spasmodically.
  3. to talk in a broken, spasmodic way.
  4. Informal Termsto work as a soda jerk.
  5. Music and Danceto dance the jerk.
  6. jerk off, Slang (vulgar). to masturbate.
jerker, n. 
jerking•ly, adv. 
  • 1540–50; 1935–40 for def. 4; perh. dialect, dialectal variant of yerk to draw stitches tight (shoemaker's term), thus making the shoe ready to wear, Old English gearcian to prepare, make ready

jerk2  ( jûrk),USA pronunciation v.t. 
  1. Foodto preserve (meat, esp. beef ) by cutting in strips and curing by drying in the sun.

adj. 
  1. Foodbeing or containing a spicy seasoning mixture flavored with allspice, used esp. in Jamaican cooking:jerk sauce.
  2. Foodprepared with jerk flavorings, esp. by barbecuing or grilling:jerk chicken.
  • back formation from jerky2 1700–10

jerk,0 +adj. 
  • Foodbeing or containing a spicy seasoning mixture flavored with allspice, used esp. in Jamaican cooking:jerk sauce.
  • Foodprepared with jerk flavorings, esp. by barbecuing or grilling:jerk chicken.

  • Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
    jerk /dʒɜːk/ vb
    1. to move or cause to move with an irregular or spasmodic motion
    2. to throw, twist, pull, or push (something) abruptly or spasmodically
    3. (transitive) often followed by out: to utter (words, sounds, etc) in a spasmodic, abrupt, or breathless manner
    n
    1. an abrupt or spasmodic movement
    2. an irregular jolting motion: the car moved with a jerk

    3. Also called: physical jerks (plural) Brit informal physical exercises
    4. slang chiefly US Canadian a person regarded with contempt, esp a stupid or ignorant person
    Etymology: 16th Century: probably variant of yerk to pull stitches tight in making a shoe; compare Old English gearcian to make ready

    ˈjerker n
    jerk /dʒɜːk/ vb (transitive)
    1. to preserve (venison, beef, etc) by cutting into thin strips and curing by drying in the sun
    n

    1. Also called: jerky jerked meat, esp beef
    Etymology: 18th Century: back formation from jerky, from charqui
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