jam

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈdʒæm/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/dʒæm/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling( jam)

Inflections of 'jam' (v): (⇒ conjugate)
jams
v 3rd person singular
jamming
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."
jammed
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed."
jammed
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
jam1 /dʒæm/USA pronunciation   v.,  jammed, jam•ming, n. 
v. 
  1. to press, squeeze, or push into a confined space;
    fill tightly: [+ object (+ in/into + object)]He jammed his socks into a drawer.[+ in/into + object]The commuters jammed into the packed subway car.
  2. to bruise or crush by squeezing:[+ object]She jammed her hand in the door.
  3. to push or thrust violently on or against something: [+ object + on + object]Jam your foot on the brake.[+ on + object]Jam on the brakes, quick!
  4. to block up by crowding:[+ object]Crowds jammed the doors.
  5. to put or place in position with a quick or violent gesture: [+ object (+ on + object)]He jammed his hat on his head.[+ on + object]He jammed on his hat.[+ object + on]He jammed his hat on.
  6. (of a machine, part, etc.) to (cause to) become unworkable, as through parts being moved out of place, becoming stuck, etc.: [no object]The lock jammed and I couldn't open it.[+ object]I jammed the lock.
  7. Radio and Television to interfere with (radio signals or the like) by sending out other signals of approximately the same frequency:[+ object]The government jammed broadcasts from the rebels.
  8. Music and Dance to participate in a jam session:[no object]The musicians jammed for a few hours.

n. [countable]
  1. the act of jamming or the state of being jammed:a huge jam of people; a traffic jam.
  2. Informal Termsa difficult or embarrassing situation;
    predicament;
    fix.

jam2 /dʒæm/USA pronunciation   n. [uncountablecountable]
  1. Fooda food made from crushed fruit boiled with sugar.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
jam1  ( jam),USA pronunciation v.,  jammed, jam•ming, n. 
v.t. 
  1. to press, squeeze, or wedge tightly between bodies or surfaces, so that motion or extrication is made difficult or impossible:The ship was jammed between two rocks.
  2. to bruise or crush by squeezing:She jammed her hand in the door.
  3. to fill too tightly;
    cram:He jammed the suitcase with clothing.
  4. to press, push, or thrust violently, as into a confined space or against some object:She jammed her foot on the brake.
  5. to fill or block up by crowding;
    pack or obstruct:Crowds jammed the doors.
  6. to put or place in position with a violent gesture (often fol. by on):He jammed his hat on and stalked out of the room.
  7. to make (something) unworkable by causing parts to become stuck, blocked, caught, displaced, etc.:to jam a lock.
  8. [Radio.]
    • Radio and Televisionto interfere with (radio signals or the like) by sending out other signals of approximately the same frequency.
    • Radio and Television(of radio signals or the like) to interfere with (other signals).
  9. Music and Danceto play (a piece) in a freely improvised, swinging way;
    jazz up:to jam both standard tunes and the classics.
  10. Nautical, Naval Termsto head (a sailing ship) as nearly as possible into the wind without putting it in stays or putting it wholly aback.

v.i. 
  1. to become stuck, wedged, fixed, blocked, etc.:This door jams easily.
  2. to press or push, often violently, as into a confined space or against one another:They jammed into the elevator.
  3. (of a machine, part, etc.) to become unworkable, as through the wedging or displacement of a part.
  4. Music and Dance[Jazz.]to participate in a jam session.

n. 
  1. the act of jamming or the state of being jammed.
  2. a mass of objects, vehicles, etc., jammed together or otherwise unable to move except slowly:a log jam; a traffic jam.
  3. Informal Termsa difficult or embarrassing situation;
    fix:He got himself into a jam with his boss.
  4. Music and DanceSee  jam session. 
  • 1700–10; apparently imitative; compare champ1, dam1

jam2  ( jam),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. Fooda preserve of whole fruit, slightly crushed, boiled with sugar:strawberry jam.
  2. British Termsput on jam, [Australian Slang.]to adopt a self-important manner or use affected speech.
jamlike′, jammy, adj. 
  • perh. special use of jam1 1720–30

Jam., 
  • Place NamesJamaica.

  • Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
    jam /dʒæm/ vb (jams, jamming, jammed)
    1. (transitive) to cram or wedge into or against something: to jam paper into an incinerator
    2. (transitive) to crowd or pack: cars jammed the roads
    3. to make or become stuck or locked
    4. (transitive) often followed by on: to activate suddenly (esp in the phrase jam on the brakes)
    5. (transitive) to block; congest
    6. (transitive) to crush, bruise, or squeeze; smash
    7. to prevent the clear reception of (radio communications or radar signals) by transmitting other signals on the same frequency
    8. (intransitive) slang to play in a jam session
    n
    1. a crowd or congestion in a confined space: a traffic jam
    2. the act of jamming or the state of being jammed
    3. informal a difficult situation; predicament: to help a friend out of a jam
    4. See jam session
    Etymology: 18th Century: probably of imitative origin; compare champ1

    ˈjammer n
    jam /dʒæm/ n
    1. a preserve containing fruit, which has been boiled with sugar until the mixture sets
    2. slang something desirable: you want jam on it
    Etymology: 18th Century: perhaps from jam1 (the act of squeezing)
    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
    Jam. abbreviation for
    1. Jamaica
    2. James
    'jam' also found in these entries:
    Collocations: a [strawberry, blueberry] jam doughnut, a [strawberry] jam [layer, topping, filling], store [coins, bills, cash] in a jam jar, more...

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