hug

Listen:
UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈhʌg/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/hʌg/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(hug)


Inflections of 'hug' (v): (⇒ conjugate)
hugs
v 3rd person singular
hugging
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."
hugged
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed."
hugged
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
hug /hʌg/USA pronunciation   v.,  hugged, hug•ging, n. 
v. 
  1. to hold or clasp tightly in the arms;
    embrace: [+ object]to hug one's child.[no object]They were hugging and crying.
  2. to keep close to:[+ object]The boat hugged the shore.

n. [countable]
  1. a tight clasp with the arms;
    embrace.
hug•ger, n. [countable]

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
hug  (hug),USA pronunciation v.,  hugged, hug•ging, n. 
v.t. 
  1. to clasp tightly in the arms, esp. with affection;
    embrace.
  2. to cling firmly or fondly to;
    cherish:to hug an opinion.
  3. to keep close to, as in sailing, walking, or in moving along or alongside of:to hug the shore; to hug the road.

v.i. 
  1. to cling together;
    lie close.

n. 
  1. a tight clasp with the arms;
    embrace.
hugger, n. 
hugging•ly, adv. 
  • Old Norse hugga to soothe, console; akin to Old English hogian to care for
  • perh. 1560–70

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
hug /hʌɡ/ vb (hugs, hugging, hugged)(mainly tr)
  1. (also intr) to clasp (another person or thing) tightly or (of two people) to cling close together; embrace
  2. to keep close to a shore, kerb, etc
  3. to cling to (beliefs, etc); cherish
  4. to congratulate (oneself); be delighted with (oneself)
n
  1. a tight or fond embrace
Etymology: 16th Century: probably of Scandinavian origin; related to Old Norse hugga to comfort, Old English hogian to take care of

ˈhuggable adj
'hug' also found in these entries:
Advertisements
Advertisements

Report an inappropriate ad.