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WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
host1 /hoʊst/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. a person who receives or entertains guests.
  2. Show Businessa person who introduces a television or radio show, or one who interviews guests.
  3. one that provides resources, as for a convention:The host country for the Olympics was Spain.
  4. the owner or manager of a hotel.
  5. Ecologya living animal or plant from which a parasite obtains nutrition.
  6. Also,  ˈhost comˌput•er. a computer to which other computers are connected and from which data and programs are used.

v. [+ object]
  1. to be the host at (a dinner, reception, etc.):The chairman hosted the party for her staff.

host2 /hoʊst/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. [ usually: ~ + of] a great number of persons or things;
    multitude:a host of details.
  2. an army.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
host1  (hōst),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. a person who receives or entertains guests at home or elsewhere:the host at a theater party.
  2. a master of ceremonies, moderator, or interviewer for a television or radio program.
  3. a person, place, company, or the like, that provides services, resources, etc., as for a convention or sporting event:Our city would like to serve as host for the next Winter Olympics.
  4. the landlord of an inn.
  5. a living animal or plant from which a parasite obtains nutrition.
  6. [Surg.]the recipient of a graft. Cf. donor (def. 2).

v.t. 
  1. to be the host at (a dinner, reception, etc.):He hosted a reception for new members.
  2. to act as host to:The vice president hosted the foreign dignitaries during their visit.
  3. to act as master of ceremonies, moderator, or interviewer for:to host a popular talk show.

v.i. 
  1. to perform the duties or functions of a host.
hostless, adj. 
hostship, n. 
  • *hosti-pot(i)s or *hos-pot(i)s, equivalent. to hos(ti)- combining form of hostis stranger (see host2) + -pot(i)s, akin to potis having the power to, posse to be able (see potent) (hence, "one granting hospitality, one in charge of guests''); compare, with different initial elements, Greek despótēs master, despot, Lithuanian viéŝpats lord
  • Latin hospit- (stem of hospes) host, guest, stranger, perh.
  • Middle French
  • Middle English (h)oste (noun, nominal) 1250–1300

host2  (hōst),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. a multitude or great number of persons or things:a host of details.
  2. an army.
  • Latin hostis stranger, enemy; akin to guest
  • Old French
  • Middle English (h)oste 1250–1300
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged swarm, crowd, drove, throng, horde, myriad.

Host  (hōst),USA pronunciation n. [Eccles.]
  1. Religionthe bread or wafer consecrated in the celebration of the Eucharist.
  • Late Latin, as above
  • Middle French oiste
  • Late Latin hostia Eucharistic wafer (Latin: victim, sacrifice); replacing Middle English oyst
  • Middle English hoste 1275–1325

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
host /həʊst/ n
  1. a person who receives or entertains guests, esp in his own home
  2. a country or organization which provides facilities for and receives visitors to an event
  3. (as modifier): the host nation
  4. the compere of a show or television programme
  5. an animal or plant that nourishes and supports a parasite
  6. an animal, esp an embryo, into which tissue is experimentally grafted
  7. a computer connected to a network and providing facilities to other computers and their users
  8. the owner or manager of an inn
vb
  1. to be the host of (a party, programme, etc): to host one's own show
Etymology: 13th Century: from French hoste, from Latin hospes guest, foreigner, from hostis enemy
host /həʊst/ n
  1. a great number; multitude
  2. an archaic word for army
Etymology: 13th Century: from Old French hoste, from Latin hostis stranger, enemy
Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
Host /həʊst/ n
  1. the bread consecrated in the Eucharist
Etymology: 14th Century: from Old French oiste, from Latin hostia victim
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