hood

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈhʊd/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/hʊd/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(hŏŏd; also for 'hoodlum,' ho̅o̅d)


WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
hood1 /hʊd/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. Clothinga soft or flexible covering for the head and neck:I pulled up my hood when it started to snow.
  2. Botanysomething resembling this, esp. in shape, as the covering of a baby carriage.
  3. Automotivethe hinged movable part at the front of an automobile body covering the engine.

v. [+ object]
  1. to cover with or as if with a hood.
hood•ed, adj. 

hood2 /hʊd/USA pronunciation   n. [countable][Slang.]
  1. Slang Termsa hoodlum.

hood3 /hʊd/USA pronunciation   n. [countable][Slang.]
  1. Slang Termsa neighborhood.

-hood, suffix. 
    • -hood is used to form nouns with the meaning "the state or condition of'':likely + -hood → likelihood (= the state or condition of being likely);child + -hood → childhood (= the state or period of time of being a child).
    • -hood is also used to form nouns with the meaning "a body or group of persons of a particular character or class'':priest + -hood → priesthood (= a body of priests).

  • WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
    hood1  (hŏŏd),USA pronunciation n. 
    1. Clothinga soft or flexible covering for the head and neck, either separate or attached to a cloak, coat, or the like.
    2. Botanysomething resembling or suggesting such a covering, esp. in shape, as certain petals or sepals.
    3. Automotivethe hinged, movable part of an automobile body covering the engine.
    4. British Termsthe roof of a carriage.
    5. a metal cover or canopy for a stove, ventilator, etc.
    6. Sport[Falconry.]a cover for the entire head of a hawk, used when the bird is not in pursuit of game.
    7. an ornamental ruffle or fold on the back of the shoulders of an academic gown, jurist's robe, etc.
    8. Zoologya crest or band of color on the head of certain birds and animals.

    v.t. 
    1. to furnish with a hood.
    2. to cover with or as if with a hood.
    hoodless, adj. 
    hoodlike′, adj. 
    • bef. 900; 1925–30, American. for def. 3; Middle English hode, Old English hōd; cognate with Old Frisian hōde, Dutch hoed, German Hut hat

    hood2  (hŏŏd, ho̅o̅d),USA pronunciation n. [Slang.]
    1. Slang Termsa hoodlum.
    • by shortening 1925–30

    'hood  (hŏŏd),USA pronunciation n. 
  • Slang Termsneighborhood.
    • by shortening 1985–90

    Hood  (hŏŏd),USA pronunciation n. 
    1. BiographicalJohn Bell, 1831–79, Confederate general in the U.S. Civil War.
    2. Raymond Math•ew•son  (hŏŏd),USA pronunciation 1881–1934, U.S. architect.
    3. BiographicalRobin. See  Robin Hood. 
    4. BiographicalThomas, 1799–1845, English poet and humorist.
    5. Place NamesMount, a volcanic peak in N Oregon, in the Cascade Range. 11,253 ft. (3430 m).

    -hood, 
  • a native English suffix denoting state, condition, character, nature, etc., or a body of persons of a particular character or class, formerly used in the formation of nouns:childhood; knighthood;priesthood.
    • Middle English -hode, -hod, Old English -hād (cognate with German -heit), special use of hād condition, state, order, quality, rank

    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
    hood /hʊd/ n
    1. a loose head covering either attached to a cloak or coat or made as a separate garment
    2. something resembling this in shape or use
    3. the US and Canadian name for bonnet
    4. the folding roof of a convertible car
    5. a hoodlike garment worn over an academic gown, indicating its wearer's degree and university
    6. a structure or marking, such as the fold of skin on the head of a cobra, that covers or appears to cover the head or some similar part
    vb
    1. (transitive) to cover or provide with or as if with a hood
    Etymology: Old English hōd; related to Old High German huot hat, Middle Dutch hoet, Latin cassis helmet; see hat

    ˈhoodˌlike adj
    hood /hʊd/ n
    1. slang
      short for hoodlum
    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
    Hood /hʊd/ n
    1. Robin
      See Robin Hood
    2. Samuel, 1st Viscount. 1724–1816, British admiral. He fought successfully against the French during the American Revolution and the French Revolutionary Wars
    3. Thomas. 1799–1845, British poet and humorist: his work includes protest poetry, such as The Song of the Shirt (1843) and The Bridge of Sighs (1844)
    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
    -hood suffix forming nouns
    1. indicating state or condition of being: manhood, adulthood
    2. indicating a body of persons: knighthood, priesthood
    Etymology: Old English -hād
    'hood' also found in these entries:
    Collocations: pulled the hood (up) over her head, pulled the hood (down) over her face, brushed the [snow, dirt, flakes] off his hood, more...

    Forum discussions with the word(s) "hood" in the title:


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