grade

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈgreɪd/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/greɪd/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(grād)


Inflections of 'grade' (v): (⇒ conjugate)
grades
v 3rd person singular
grading
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."
graded
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed."
graded
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
grade /greɪd/USA pronunciation   n., v.,  grad•ed, grad•ing. 
n. 
  1. a degree or step in a scale of quality, rank, advancement, or value:[countable]several grades of wool.
  2. [countable] a class of persons or things of the same relative rank, quality, etc.
  3. Educationa single division of a school classified, usually by year, according to the age or progress of the pupils: [uncountable]She was in third grade.[countable]students in seventh and eighth grades.
  4. Education[countable] the pupils in such a division, thought of as a group.
  5. Education[countable] a letter or other symbol indicating the relative quality of a student's work;
    mark.
  6. Civil Engineering, Rail Transport, Transport the degree at which a hill, mountain, etc., slopes up or down:[countable]steep uphill grades.

v. [+ object]
  1. to arrange in a series of grades;
    classify;
    sort:a machine that grades eggs.
  2. Educationto assign a grade to (a student's work);
    mark.
  3. Civil Engineeringto reduce to a level that is less steep:to grade a road.
Idioms
  1. Idiomsmake the grade, to attain or reach a specific goal;
    succeed.

See -grad-.
WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
grade  (grād),USA pronunciation n., v.,  grad•ed, grad•ing. 
n. 
  1. a degree or step in a scale, as of rank, advancement, quality, value, or intensity:the best grade of paper.
  2. a class of persons or things of the same relative rank, quality, etc.
  3. a step or stage in a course or process.
  4. Educationa single division of a school classified according to the age or progress of the pupils. In the U.S., public schools are commonly divided into twelve grades below college.
  5. Educationthe pupils in such a division.
  6. Educationgrades, elementary school (usually prec. by the):He first began teaching in the grades.
  7. Educationa letter, number, or other symbol indicating the relative quality of a student's work in a course, examination, or special assignment;
    mark.
  8. Fooda classification or standard of food based on quality, size, etc.:grade A milk.
  9. Civil Engineering, Rail Transport, Transportinclination with the horizontal of a road, railroad, etc., usually expressed by stating the vertical rise or fall as a percentage of the horizontal distance;
    slope.
  10. BuildingAlso called  grade line. the level at which the ground intersects the foundation of a building.
  11. Animal Husbandryan animal resulting from a cross between a parent of ordinary stock and one of a pure breed.
  12. Mathematicsgrad2.
  13. Idiomsat grade: 
    • Rail Transporton the same level:A railroad crosses a highway at grade.
    • (of a stream bed) so adjusted to conditions of slope and the volume and speed of water that no gain or loss of sediment takes place.
  14. Idiomsmake the grade, to attain a specific goal;
    succeed:He'll never make the grade in medical school.
  15. Idiomsup to grade, of the desired or required quality:This shipment is not up to grade.

v.t. 
  1. to arrange in a series of grades;
    class;
    sort:a machine that grades two thousand eggs per hour.
  2. to determine the grade of.
  3. to assign a grade to (a student's work);
    mark:I graded forty tests last night.
  4. to cause to pass by degrees, as from one color or shade to another.
  5. Civil Engineeringto reduce to a level or to practicable degrees of inclination:to grade a road.
  6. Animal Husbandryto cross (an ordinary or low-grade animal) with an animal of a pure or superior breed.

v.i. 
  1. to incline;
    slant or slope:The road grades steeply for a mile.
  2. to be of a particular grade or quality.
  3. to pass by degrees from one color or shade to another;
    blend:See how the various colors grade into one another.
  4. Animal Husbandrygrade up, to improve (a herd, flock, etc.) by breeding with purebreds.
  • Latin gradus step, stage, degree, derivative of gradī to go, step, walk
  • French: office
  • 1505–15
    • 16.See corresponding entry in Unabridged classify, rank, rate, order, categorize.

-grade, 
  • a combining form meaning "walking, moving,'' in the manner or by the means specified by the initial element:plantigrade.
    • Latin -gradus, combining form representing gradus step or gradī to walk. See grade, gradient

    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
    grade /ɡreɪd/ n
    1. a position or degree in a scale, as of quality, rank, size, or progression: small-grade eggs, high-grade timber
    2. a group of people or things of the same category
    3. chiefly US a military or other rank
    4. a stage in a course of progression
    5. a mark or rating indicating achievement or the worth of work done, as at school
    6. US Canadian a unit of pupils of similar age or ability taught together at school
    7. make the gradeinformal to reach the required standard
    8. to succeed
    vb
    1. (transitive) to arrange according to quality, rank, etc
    2. (transitive) to determine the grade of or assign a grade to
    3. (intransitive) to achieve or deserve a grade or rank
    4. to change or blend (something) gradually; merge
    5. (transitive) to level (ground, a road, etc) to a suitable gradient
    Etymology: 16th Century: from French, from Latin gradus step, from gradī to step
    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
    -grade adj combining form
    1. indicating a kind or manner of movement or progression: plantigrade, retrograde
    Etymology: via French from Latin -gradus, from gradus a step, from gradī to walk
    'grade' also found in these entries:
    Collocations: US: grade the [paper, exam, homework], got [good, bad, high, low] grades this [year, semester], is (still) in grade school, more...

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