flag

UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈflæg/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/flæg/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(flag)

Inflections of 'flag' (v): (⇒ conjugate)
flags
v 3rd person singular
flagging
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."
flagged
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed."
flagged
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
flag1 /flæg/USA pronunciation   n., v.,  flagged, flag•ging. 
n. [countable]
  1. a usually rectangular piece of cloth marked with distinctive colors or designs and used as a symbol, as of a nation, or as a means of signaling:The American flag has both stars and stripes.

v. [+ object]
  1. to signal or warn with or as if with a flag: [ ~ (+ down) + obj]:to flag (down) a taxi.[ + obj (+ down)]:to flag a taxi (down).
  2. to mark (a page, file, card, etc.) for attention, as by attaching protruding tabs:I flagged the section of the paper I thought you should read.

flag3 /flæg/USA pronunciation   v. [no object], flagged, flag•ging. 
  1. to fall off in vigor, energy or interest;
    droop:Attendance flagged after the team lost.

flag4 /flæg/USA pronunciation  n. 
WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
flag1  (flag),USA pronunciation n., v.,  flagged, flag•ging. 
n. 
  1. a piece of cloth, varying in size, shape, color, and design, usually attached at one edge to a staff or cord, and used as the symbol of a nation, state, or organization, as a means of signaling, etc.;
    ensign;
    standard;
    banner;
    pennant.
  2. Birds[Ornith.]the tuft of long feathers on the legs of falcons and most hawks;
    the lengthened feathers on the crus or tibia.
  3. Sport[Hunting.]the tail of a deer or of a setter dog.
  4. Journalism
    • Journalismthe nameplate of a newspaper.
    • , Printing, Journalismmasthead (def. 1).
    • Journalismthe name of a newspaper as printed on the editorial page.
  5. a tab or tag attached to a page, file card, etc., to mark it for attention.
  6. Music and Dancehook (def. 12a).
  7. Cinema[Motion Pictures, Television.]a small gobo.
  8. Usually,  flags. the ends of the bristles of a brush, esp. a paintbrush, when split.
  9. Computinga symbol, value, or other means of identifying data of interest, or of informing later parts of a program what conditions earlier parts have encountered.
  10. strike the flag: 
    • Idiomsto relinquish command, as of a ship.
    • Idiomsto submit or surrender:His financial situation is growing worse, but he's not ready to strike the flag.Also,  strike one's flag. 

v.t. 
  1. to place a flag or flags over or on;
    decorate with flags.
  2. to signal or warn (a person, automobile, etc.) with or as if with a flag (sometimes fol. by down):to flag a taxi; to flag down a passing car.
  3. to communicate (information) by or as if by a flag.
  4. to decoy, as game, by waving a flag or the like to excite attention or curiosity.
  5. to mark (a page in a book, file card, etc.) for attention, as by attaching protruding tabs.
  6. (of a brush) to split the ends of the bristles.
flagger, n. 
flagless, adj. 
  • perh. blend of, blended flap (noun, nominal) and fag1 (noun, nominal) in obsolete sense "flap'' 1475–85

flag2  (flag),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. Plant Biologyany of various plants with long, sword-shaped leaves, as the sweet flag.
  2. Plant BiologySee  blue flag. 
  3. the long, slender leaf of such a plant or of a cereal.
  • Middle English flagge 1350–1400

flag3  (flag),USA pronunciation v.i.,  flagged, flag•ging. 
  1. to fall off in vigor, energy, activity, interest, etc.:Public enthusiasm flagged when the team kept losing.
  2. to hang loosely or limply;
    droop.
  • perh. blend of, blended of flap (verb, verbal) and fag1 (verb, verbal) in obsolete sense "to droop''. See flag1 1535–45
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged dwindle, wilt, slump, sag, wane.

flag4  (flag),USA pronunciation n., v.,  flagged, flag•ging. 
n. 
  1. Buildingflagstone (def. 1).
  2. Buildingflags, flagstone (def. 2).

v.t. 
  1. Buildingto pave with flagstones.
flagger, n. 
  • 1400–50; late Middle English flagge piece of sod; akin to Old Norse flaga slab

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
flag /flæɡ/ n
  1. a piece of cloth, esp bunting, often attached to a pole or staff, decorated with a design and used as an emblem, symbol, or standard or as a means of signalling
  2. a small paper flag, emblem, or sticker sold on flag days
  3. the conspicuously marked tail of a deer
  4. Austral NZ the part of a taximeter that is raised when a taxi is for hire
  5. show the flagto assert a claim, as to a territory or stretch of water, by military presence
  6. informal to be present; make an appearance
vb (flags, flagging, flagged)(transitive)
  1. to decorate or mark with a flag or flags
  2. (often followed by down) to warn or signal (a vehicle) to stop
  3. to send or communicate (messages, information, etc) by flag
Etymology: 16th Century: of uncertain origin

ˈflagger n
flag /flæɡ/ vb (flags, flagging, flagged)(intransitive)
  1. to hang down; become limp; droop
  2. to decline in strength or vigour; become weak or tired
Etymology: 16th Century: of unknown origin
flag /flæɡ/ n
  1. any of various plants that have long swordlike leaves, esp the iris Iris pseudacorus (yellow flag)
  2. the leaf of any such plant
Etymology: 14th Century: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Dutch flag, Danish flæg yellow iris
flag /flæɡ/ n
  1. short for flagstone
vb (flags, flagging, flagged)
  1. (transitive) to furnish (a floor) with flagstones
WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
flag•stone /ˈflægˌstoʊn/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. Buildinga flat stone slab used esp. for paving.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
flag•stone  (flagstōn′),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. BuildingAlso called  flag. a flat stone slab used esp. for paving.
  2. Buildingflagstones, a walk, terrace, etc., paved with flagstones.
  3. Rocksrock, as sandstone or shale, suitable for splitting into flagstones.
  • flag4 + stone 1720–30

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
flagstone /ˈflæɡˌstəʊn/, flag n
  1. a hard fine-textured rock, such as a sandstone or shale, that can be split up into slabs for paving
  2. a slab of such a rock
Etymology: 15th Century flag (in the sense: sod, turf), from Old Norse flaga slab; compare Old English flæcg plaster, poultice
'flag' also found in these entries (note: many are not synonyms or translations):
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