far

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈfɑːr/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/fɑr/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(fär)


Inflections of 'far' (adjadjective: Describes a noun or pronoun--for example, "a tall girl," "an interesting book," "a big house."):
farther
adj comparative
further
adj comparative
farthest
adj superlative
furthest
adj superlative

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
far /fɑr/USA pronunciation   adv., adj.,  far•ther or fur•ther, far•thest or fur•thest. 
adv. 
  1. at or to a great distance or remote point;
    a long way off:How far is it from here?
  2. at or to a remote or advanced time;
    for a long time:They stayed up talking far into the night.
  3. at or to a great, advanced, or definite point or degree of progress:You may have gone too far.
  4. much or many:I need far more time.

adj. 
  1. being at a great distance;
    remote in time or place:the far future.
  2. more distant of the two:[before a noun]The window is in the far corner.
Idioms
  1. Idiomsa far cry: 
    • quite some distance;
      removed:a far cry from civilization.
    • very different;
      in sharp contrast:This tiny apartment is a far cry from what she is accustomed to.
  2. Idiomsby far: 
    • by a great deal;
      very much:That minivan is too expensive by far.
    • plainly;
      obviously:This melon is by far the ripest of all.
  3. Idiomsfar and away, without doubt;
    to a large extent:This was far and away the best house we could find.
  4. Idiomsfar and wide, to great lengths;
    over great distances:The boy searched far and wide for his dog.
  5. Idiomsfar be it from me, I do not wish or dare (to interrupt, criticize, etc.):Far be it from me to complain.
  6. Idiomsgo far, [no obj] to achieve a great deal:She's a promising worker; I'm sure she'll go far.
  7. Idiomshow far, to what distance, extent, or degree:How far can we go with this plan?
  8. Idiomsso far: 
    • up to now:So far the budget cuts haven't hit us too badly.
    • up to a certain point or extent:The road was built only so far before they ran out of money.
  9. Idiomsthe far side, the farther or opposite side:the far side of the moon.
  10. Idiomsthus far, so far:Thus far we've been spared any crises.


WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
far  (fär),USA pronunciation adv., adj.,  far•ther  or fur•ther, far•thest  or fur•thest. 
adv. 
  1. at or to a great distance;
    a long way off;
    at or to a remote point:We sailed far ahead of the fleet.
  2. at or to a remote or advanced time:We talked far into the night.
  3. at or to a great, advanced, or definite point of progress, or degree:Having come this far, we might as well continue.
  4. much or many:I need far more time. We gained far more advantages.
  5. Idiomsas far as. See  as1 (def. 16).
  6. Idiomsby far: 
    • by a great deal;
      very much:too expensive by far.
    • plainly;
      obviously:This melon is by far the ripest of the lot.
  7. Idiomsfar and away, by far;
    undoubtedly:She is far and away the smartest one in the class.
  8. Idiomsfar and wide, to great lengths;
    over great distances:He traveled far and wide in search of his missing son.Also,  far and near, near and far. 
  9. Idiomsfar be it from me, I do not wish or dare (to interrupt, criticize, etc.):Far be it from me to complain, but it's getting stuffy in here.
  10. Idioms, Slang Termsfar out, [Slang.]
    • unconventional;
      offbeat:His sense of humor is far out.
    • radical;
      extreme:political opinions that are far out.
    • recondite or esoteric:an interest in art that was considered far out.
  11. Idiomsgo far: 
    • to attain success:With so much talent he should go far.
    • to have a great effect toward;
      help:The new evidence will go far toward proving the defendant's guilt.
  12. Idiomshow far, to what distance, extent, or degree:She didn't know how far they had gone in the mathematics text. How far do you think they can be trusted?
  13. Idiomsso far: 
    • up to now:So far, I've had no reply to my request.
    • up to a certain point or extent:We were able to plan only so far because of various factors beyond our control.
  14. Idiomsso far so good, succeeding or managing adequately to this point;
    doing well thus far:The work is difficult, but so far so good.
  15. Idiomsthus far: 
    • up to the present;
      up to now:We have met no resistance to our plan thus far.
    • to a particular degree, point, or extent:When you get thus far in the experiment, consult with the professor.

adj. 
  1. being at a great distance;
    remote in time or place:a far country; the far future.
  2. extending to a great distance:the far frontiers of empire.
  3. more distant of the two:the far side.
  4. Idiomsa far cry from. See  cry (def. 30).
  5. Idiomsfew and far between. See  few (def. 2).
  6. Idiomson the far side of. See  side (def. 21).
  7. Idiomsthe far side. See  side (def. 24).
farness, n. 
  • bef. 900; Middle English far, fer, Old English feorr; cognate with Old High German ferr, Old Norse fjar, Gothic fairra; akin to German fern far, Latin porrō forward, further
    See  as, farther. 

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
far /fɑː/ adv (farther, further, farthest, furthest)
  1. at, to, or from a great distance
  2. at or to a remote time: far in the future
  3. to a considerable degree; very much: a far better plan
  4. as far asto the degree or extent that
  5. to the distance or place of
  6. informal with reference to; as for
  7. by farby a considerable margin
  8. far and awayby a very great margin
  9. far and wideover great distances; everywhere
  10. far be it from meI would not presume; on no account: far be it from me to tell you what to do
  11. go farto be successful; achieve much: your son will go far
  12. to be sufficient or last long: the wine didn't go far
  13. go too farto exceed reasonable limits
  14. so farup to the present moment
  15. up to a certain point, extent, degree, etc
adj (prenominal)
  1. remote in space or time: a far country, in the far past
  2. extending a great distance; long
  3. more distant: the far end of the room
  4. far fromin a degree, state, etc, remote from: he is far from happy
Etymology: Old English feorr; related to Old Frisian fīr, Old High German ferro, Latin porro forwards, Greek pera further

ˈfarness n
WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
far•ther /ˈfɑrðɚ/USA pronunciation   adv., [comparative of]far with farthest  as superlative.
  1. at or to a greater distance:farther down the road.
  2. at or to a more advanced point:to go no farther in one's education.
  3. at or to a greater degree or extent.

adj., [compar. of  far withfarthest  as superl.]
  1. more distant or remote:the farther side of the mountain.

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
far•thest /ˈfɑrðɪst/USA pronunciation   adj., [superlative of]far with farther  as comparative.
  1. most distant or remote:Who came the farthest?
  2. most extended;
    longest.

adv., [superl. of  far withfarther  as compar.]
  1. at or to the greatest distance or most advanced point:This is the farthest I've been from home.
  2. at or to the greatest degree or extent:That is the farthest they have ever pushed my patience.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
far•ther  (färᵺər),USA pronunciation adv., [compar. of] far  with farthest  as superl.
  1. at or to a greater distance:He went farther down the road.
  2. at or to a more advanced point:They are going no farther in their studies.
  3. at or to a greater degree or extent:The application of the law was extended farther.

adj., compar. of far withfarthest  as superl. 
  1. more distant or remote than something or some place nearer:the farther side of the mountain.
  2. extending or tending to a greater distance:He made a still farther trip.
  3. [Nonstandard.]further (defs. 5, 6).
  • 1300–50; Middle English ferther; origin, originally variant of further
    Although some usage guides insist that only farther should be used for physical distance (We walked farther than we planned), farther and further have been used interchangeably throughout much of their histories. However, only further is used in the adverbial sense "moreover'' (Further, you hurt my feelings) and in the adjectival senses "more extended'' (no further comment) and "additional'' (Further bulletins came in).The expression all the farther (or further) in place of as far as occurs chiefly in informal speech:This is all the farther the train goes.See also  all. 

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
far•thest  (färᵺist),USA pronunciation adj., [superl. of] far  with farther  as compar.
  1. most distant or remote.
  2. most extended;
    longest.

adv., superl. of far withfarther  as compar. 
  1. at or to the greatest distance.
  2. at or to the most advanced point.
  3. at or to the greatest degree or extent.
  • 1350–1400; Middle English ferthest; origin, originally variant of furthest

'far' also found in these entries:
Synonyms: away, more...
Collocations: on the far side of [town, the park], is a far distance to, a far stretch to [say, go, do], more...

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Look up "far" at dictionary.com

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