fake

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈfeɪk/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/feɪk/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(fāk)


Inflections of 'fake' (v): (⇒ conjugate)
fakes
v 3rd person singular
faking
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."
faked
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed."
faked
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
fake1 /feɪk/USA pronunciation   v.,  faked, fak•ing, n., adj. 
v. [+ object]
  1. to create or produce (something) in order to mislead, deceive, or cheat others:The embezzler faked the report.
  2. to pretend;
    simulate;
    feign:faking illness.
  3. to imitate convincingly or acceptably;
    counterfeit:to fake some expensive paintings.
  4. fake it, [no object] to accomplish by trial and error or by improvising:He doesn't know how to use that computer, he's just faking it.

n. [countable]
  1. anything that misleads, deceives, cheats, or fools others by seeming to be what it is not;
    counterfeit;
    sham:The diamond was a fake.
  2. a person who fakes;
    fraud:That salesman is a fake.

adj. 
  1. designed to deceive or cheat;
    counterfeit:a fake diamond.
fak•er, n. [countable]

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
fake1  (fāk),USA pronunciation v.,  faked, fak•ing, n., adj. 
v.t. 
  1. prepare or make (something specious, deceptive, or fraudulent):to fake a report showing nonexistent profits.
  2. to conceal the defects of or make appear more attractive, interesting, valuable, etc., usually in order to deceive:The story was faked a bit to make it more sensational.
  3. to pretend;
    simulate:to fake illness.
  4. to accomplish by trial and error or by improvising:I don't know the job, but I can fake it.
  5. to trick or deceive (an opponent) by making a fake (often fol. by out):The running back faked out the defender with a deft move and scored.
  6. Music and Dance[Jazz.]
    • to improvise:to fake an accompaniment.
    • to play (music) without reading from a score.

v.i. 
  1. to fake something;
    pretend.
  2. to give a fake to an opponent.
  3. fake out, [Slang.]
    • to trick;
      deceive:She faked me out by acting friendly and then stole my job.
    • to surprise, as by a sudden reversal:They thought we weren't coming back, but we faked them out by showing up during dinner.

n. 
  1. anything made to appear otherwise than it actually is;
    counterfeit:This diamond necklace is a fake.
  2. a person who fakes;
    faker:The doctor with the reputed cure for cancer proved to be a fake.
  3. a spurious report or story.
  4. Sporta simulated play or move intended to deceive an opponent.

adj. 
  1. designed to deceive or cheat;
    not real;
    counterfeit.
  • 1805–15; origin, originally vagrants' slang: to do for, rob, kill (someone), shape (something); perh. variant of obsolete feak, feague to beat, akin to Dutch veeg a slap, vegen to sweep, wipe
    • 3.See corresponding entry in Unabridged feign, affect, dissemble, sham, fabricate.
    • 11.See corresponding entry in Unabridged fraud, impostor, quack, charlatan, deceiver.

fake2  (fāk),USA pronunciation v.,  faked, fak•ing, n. [Naut.]
v.t. 
  1. Nautical, Naval Termsto lay (a rope) in a coil or series of long loops so as to allow to run freely without fouling or kinking (often fol. by down).

n. 
  1. Nautical, Naval Termsany complete turn of a rope that has been faked down.
  2. Nautical, Naval Termsany of the various ways in which a rope may be faked down.
Also,  flake. 
  • Middle English faken to coil (a rope), of obscure origin, originally 1350–1400

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
fake /feɪk/ vb
  1. (transitive) to cause (something inferior or not genuine) to appear more valuable, desirable, or real by fraud or pretence
  2. to pretend to have (an illness, emotion, etc)
n
  1. an object, person, or act that is not genuine; sham, counterfeit, or forgery
adj
  1. not genuine; spurious
Etymology: originally (C18) thieves' slang to mug or do someone; probably via Polari from Italian facciare to make or do

ˈfaker n ˈfakery n
'fake' also found in these entries:
Collocations: fake your [name, identity, ID], you are [just, such] a fake!, fake [sunglasses, jewelry, documents, reports, news, images], more...

Forum discussions with the word(s) "fake" in the title:


Look up "fake" at Merriam-Webster
Look up "fake" at dictionary.com

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