expel

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ɪkˈspɛl/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/ɪkˈspɛl/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(ik spel)

Inflections of 'expel' (v): (⇒ conjugate)
expels
v 3rd person singular
expelling
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."
expelled
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed."
expelled
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
ex•pel /ɪkˈspɛl/USA pronunciation   v. [+ object], -pelled, -pel•ling. 
  1. to drive or force out or away;
    eject:The army expelled the rebels from the region.
See -pel-.
WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
ex•pel  (ik spel),USA pronunciation v.t.,  -pelled, -pel•ling. 
  1. to drive or force out or away;
    discharge or eject:to expel air from the lungs; to expel an invader from a country.
  2. to cut off from membership or relations:to expel a student from a college.
ex•pella•ble, adj. 
  • Latin expellere to drive out, drive away, equivalent. to ex- ex-1 + pellere to push, drive
  • Middle English expellen 1350–1400
    • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged oust, dismiss, exile, excommunicate.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
expel /ɪkˈspɛl/ vb ( -pels, -pelling, -pelled)(transitive)
  1. to eject or drive out with force
  2. to deprive of participation in or membership of a school, club, etc
Etymology: 14th Century: from Latin expellere to drive out, from pellere to thrust, drive

exˈpellable adj expellee /ˌɛkspɛˈliː/ n exˈpeller n
'expel' also found in these entries:
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