excavate

UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈɛkskəveɪt/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/ˈɛkskəˌveɪt/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(ekskə vāt′)

Inflections of 'excavate' (v): (⇒ conjugate)
excavates
v 3rd person singular
excavating
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."
excavated
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed."
excavated
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
ex•ca•vate /ˈɛkskəˌveɪt/USA pronunciation   v. [+ object], -vat•ed, -vat•ing. 
  1. Civil Engineeringto make hollow; make a hole or cavity in: The ground was excavated for a foundation.
  2. Civil Engineeringto make (a hole, tunnel, etc.) by removing material.
  3. to expose or lay bare by or as if by digging;
    unearth:The archaeologist excavated the ruins of ancient Troy.
ex•ca•va•tion /ˌɛkskəˈveɪʃən/USA pronunciation  n. [countableuncountable]
ex•ca•va•tor, n. [countable]

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
ex•ca•vate  (ekskə vāt′),USA pronunciation v.t.,  -vat•ed, -vat•ing. 
  1. Civil Engineeringto make hollow by removing the inner part;
    make a hole or cavity in;
    form into a hollow, as by digging:The ground was excavated for a foundation.
  2. Civil Engineeringto make (a hole, tunnel, etc.) by removing material.
  3. Civil Engineeringto dig or scoop out (earth, sand, etc.).
  4. to expose or lay bare by or as if by digging;
    unearth:to excavate an ancient city.
  • Latin excavātus (past participle of excavāre to hollow out), equivalent. to ex- ex-1 + cav(um) hollow, cave + -ātus -ate1
  • 1590–1600

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
excavate /ˈɛkskəˌveɪt/ vb
  1. to remove (soil, earth, etc) by digging; dig out
  2. to make (a hole, cavity, or tunnel) in (solid matter) by hollowing or removing the centre or inner part: to excavate a tooth
  3. to unearth (buried objects) methodically in an attempt to discover information about the past
Etymology: 16th Century: from Latin excavāre, from cavāre to make hollow, from cavus hollow

ˌexcaˈvation n
'excavate' also found in these entries:
Advertisements
Advertisements

Report an inappropriate ad.