disgust

UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/dɪsˈgʌst/

US:USA pronuncation: IPAUSA pronuncation: IPA/dɪsˈgʌst, dɪˈskʌst/

US:USA pronunciation: respellingUSA pronunciation: respelling(dis gust, di skust)



WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
dis•gust /dɪsˈgʌst, dɪˈskʌst/USA pronunciation   v. [+ object]
  1. to offend the sensibilities of:His terrible manners at the dinner table disgusted us.
  2. to cause a feeling of strong sickness or nausea in:The awful food at the hotel disgusted her.

n. [uncountable]
  1. repugnance caused by something offensive;
    strong hatred or aversion:He couldn't hide his disgust at the atrocity.
  2. a strong distaste;
    nausea:Feelings of disgust and trembling came over her.
    disgust is a verb and a noun, disgusting and disgusted are adjectives:Violence disgusts me. He was filled with disgust by all that violence. The movie was disgusting. The disgusted workers went home early.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
dis•gust  (dis gust, di skust),USA pronunciation v.t. 
  1. to cause loathing or nausea in.
  2. to offend the good taste, moral sense, etc., of;
    cause extreme dislike or revulsion in:Your vulgar remarks disgust me.

n. 
  1. a strong distaste;
    nausea;
    loathing.
  2. repugnance caused by something offensive;
    strong aversion:He left the room in disgust.
dis•gusted•ly, adv. 
dis•gusted•ness, n. 
  • Middle French desgoust, derivative of the verb, verbal
  • Latin gusta (see choose); (noun, nominal)
  • Middle French desgouster, equivalent. to des- dis-1 + gouster to taste, relish, derivative of goust taste
  • (verb, verbal) 1590–1600
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged sicken, nauseate.
    • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged repel, revolt.
    • 4.See corresponding entry in Unabridged abhorrence, detestation, antipathy. See  dislike. 
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged delight.
    • 4.See corresponding entry in Unabridged relish.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
disgust /dɪsˈɡʌst/ vb (transitive)
  1. to sicken or fill with loathing
  2. to offend the moral sense, principles, or taste of
n
  1. a great loathing or distaste aroused by someone or something
  2. in disgustas a result of disgust
Etymology: 16th Century: from Old French desgouster, from des- dis-1 + gouster to taste, from goust taste, from Latin gustus

disˈgustedly adv disˈgustedness n
'disgust' also found in these entries (note: many are not synonyms or translations):
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