dare

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈdɛər/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/dɛr/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(dâr)


Inflections of 'dare' (v): (⇒ conjugate)
dares
v 3rd person singular (When operating as an ordinary verb––e.g. "He who dares wins.")
dare
v 3rd person singular (When operating as a modal verb––e.g. "Dare she ask why?")
daring
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."
dared
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed."
durst
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed." (Rare: now only literary)
dared
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
dare /dɛr/USA pronunciation   v.,  dared,  dar•ing;
 pres. sing. 3rd pers. dares or dare, n. 

v. 
  1. [ + obj + to + verb] to challenge or persuade (a person) into a demonstration of courage or to do something:I dare you to climb that.
  2. [ + obj] to face;
    risk:He will dare any test to prove his manhood.

auxiliary or modal v. [ not: be + ~ -ing]
  1. As a verb that is like an auxiliary verb and like a modal verb, dare has the meaning "to have the courage or boldness to'' (do something). It occurs with negative words or phrases, and in questions, as in the examples below:
    • Like a modal verb, it is followed by the root form of the next verb:He dared not speak to me like that. How dare you speak to me like that?
    • Like an auxiliary verb, it agrees with the subject in the present tense in sentences with negative words or phrases:The girl dares not take another step.
    • Like a modal verb, in questions in the present tense, it has only one form, dare, even when the subject is he, she, or it, or a singular noun:Dare he mention the subject again?
    • Like both modal and auxiliary verbs, in questions dare goes before the subject:Dare I say it?

n. [countable]
  1. an act of daring or defiance;
    challenge:I took that stupid dare.
Idioms
  1. I daresay. Use this phrase to mean "I suppose (that)'', or "perhaps,'' as in:I daresay he's right (= I suppose he's right).

dar•er, n. [countable]

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
dare  (dâr),USA pronunciation  v.,  dared or (Archaic) durst;
dared;
daring;
 pres. sing. 3rd pers.  dares or dare, n. 

v.i. 
  1. to have the necessary courage or boldness for something;
    be bold enough:You wouldn't dare!

v.t. 
  1. to have the boldness to try;
    venture;
    hazard.
  2. to meet defiantly;
    face courageously.
  3. to challenge or provoke (a person) into a demonstration of courage;
    defy:to dare a man to fight.
  4. Idiomsdare say, daresay.

auxiliary v. 
  1. to have the necessary courage or boldness to (used chiefly in questions and negatives):How dare you speak to me like that? He dare not mention the subject again.

n. 
  1. an act of daring or defiance;
    challenge.
darer, n. 
  • bef. 900; Middle English dar (verb, verbal), Old English dear(r), 1st and 3rd person singular present indicative of durran; akin to Old High German gitarran
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged Dare, venture imply involvement in risks and dangers.
      Dare emphasizes the state of mind that makes one willing to meet danger:He dared to do what he knew was right.Venture emphasizes the act of doing something that involves risk:He ventured into deep water.
    • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged hazard, risk, brave.

Dare  (dâr),USA pronunciation n. 
  • BiographicalVirginia, 1587–?, first child born of English parents in the Western Hemisphere.

  • DARE, 
  • LinguisticsDictionary of American Regional English.

  • Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
    dare /dɛə/ vb
    1. (transitive) to challenge (a person to do something) as proof of courage
    2. (can take an infinitive with or without to) to be courageous enough to try (to do something): she dares to dress differently from the others, you wouldn't dare!
    3. (transitive) rare to oppose without fear; defy
    4. I dare say, I daresay(it is) quite possible (that)
    5. probably: used as sentence substitute
    n
    1. a challenge to do something as proof of courage
    2. something done in response to such a challenge
    Etymology: Old English durran; related to Old High German turran to venture

    ˈdarer n
    'dare' also found in these entries:
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