dancer

UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈdɑːnsər/US:USA pronunciation: respellingUSA pronunciation: respelling(dansər, dän-)


WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
danc•er  (dansər, dän-),USA pronunciation  n. 
  1. a person who dances.
  2. a person who dances professionally, as on the stage.
  • 1250–1300; Middle English dauncer; see dance, -er1

Dan•cer  (dansər, dän-),USA pronunciation n. 
  • BiographicalStanley, born 1927, U.S. harness racer and trainer.

  • WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
    dance /dæns/USA pronunciation   v.,  danced, danc•ing, n. 
    v. 
    1. Music and Danceto move following a rhythm and in a pattern of steps, esp. to the accompaniment of music: [no object]She danced in the best Broadway shows.[+ object]She danced every dance with him.
    2. to leap, skip, etc., as from excitement or emotion;
      move nimbly or quickly:[no object]We danced for joy.
    3. to bob up and down;
      move lightly and quickly:[no object]The toy sailboats danced on the pond.

    n. 
    1. Music and Dance[countable] a series of steps or bodily motions following a rhythm and usually done to music.
    2. Music and Dance a round of dancing;
      set:[countable]May I have this dance?
    3. Music and Dance the art of dancing:[uncountable]to study dance.
    4. a social gathering or party for dancing;
      ball:[countable]I met her at a high-school dance.
    Idioms
    1. Idiomsdance attendance on, [+ object] to pay a great deal of attention to (someone) with a great show of doing so:dancing attendance on her boss.

    danc•er, n. [countable]

    WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
    dance  (dans, däns),USA pronunciation v.,  danced, danc•ing, n. 
    v.i. 
    1. to move one's feet or body, or both, rhythmically in a pattern of steps, esp. to the accompaniment of music.
    2. to leap, skip, etc., as from excitement or emotion;
      move nimbly or quickly:to dance with joy.
    3. to bob up and down:The toy sailboats danced on the pond.

    v.t. 
    1. to perform or take part in (a dance):to dance a waltz.
    2. to cause to dance:He danced her around the ballroom.
    3. to cause to be in a specified condition by dancing:She danced her way to stardom.
    4. Idiomsdance attendance. See  attendance (def. 4).
    5. dance on air, [Slang.]to be hanged.
    6. Idiomsdance to another tune, to change one's behavior, attitudes, etc.

    n. 
    1. Music and Dancea successive group of rhythmical steps or bodily motions, or both, usually executed to music.
    2. Music and Dancean act or round of dancing;
      set:May I have this dance?
    3. Music and Dancethe art of dancing:to study dance.
    4. a social gathering or party for dancing;
      ball:Was he invited to the dance?
    5. Music and Dancea piece of music suited in rhythm or style to a particular form of dancing:He liked the composer's country dances.
    6. [Animal Behav.]a stylized pattern of movements performed by an animal, as a bird in courtship display, or an insect, as a honeybee in indicating a source of nectar.
    7. Music and Dancethe dance, ballet, interpretive dancing, and other dancing of an artistic nature performed by professional dancers before an audience.
    dancing•ly, adv. 
    • Anglo-French; Old French dance, derivative of dancier
    • Old High German *dansjan to lead (someone) to a dance; (noun, nominal) Middle English da(u)nce
    • Anglo-French dancer, dauncer, Old French dancier, perh.
    • (verb, verbal) Middle English da(u)ncen 1250–1300
      • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged cavort, caper, frolic, gambol, prance.

    'dancer' also found in these entries (note: many are not synonyms or translations):
    Advertisements
    Advertisements
    Report an inappropriate ad.