crumble

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈkrʌmbəl/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/ˈkrʌmbəl/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(krumbəl)

Inflections of 'crumble' (v): (⇒ conjugate)
crumbles
v 3rd person singular
crumbling
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."
crumbled
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed."
crumbled
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
crum•ble /ˈkrʌmbəl/USA pronunciation   v.,  -bled, -bling. 
  1. to (cause to) break into small fragments: [no object]The ancient paper crumbled in his hands.[+ object]I crumbled the dried leaves in my fingers.
  2. [no object] to disintegrate gradually;
    collapse;
    lose strength: The ancient empire was crumbling from within.
crum•bly, adj.,  -bli•er, -bli•est. 

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
crum•ble  (krumbəl),USA pronunciation v.,  -bled, -bling, n. 
v.t. 
  1. to break into small fragments or crumbs.

v.i. 
  1. to fall into small pieces;
    break or part into small fragments.
  2. to decay or disintegrate gradually:The ancient walls had crumbled.

n. 
  1. a crumbly or crumbled substance.
  2. Foodcrumbles, bits of crisp bacon, bread, etc., added to other foods, esp. as a topping.
  3. British Termscrumb;
    particle;
    fragment.
crumbling•ness, n. 
  • 1375–1425; earlier crymble, crimble; late Middle English kremelen, akin to crome crumb; see -le
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged mash, shatter.
    • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged disintegrate.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
crumble /ˈkrʌmbəl/ vb
  1. to break or be broken into crumbs or fragments
  2. (intransitive) to fall apart or away
n
  1. Brit a baked pudding consisting of a crumbly mixture of flour, fat, and sugar over stewed fruit: apple crumble
Etymology: 16th Century: variant of crimble, of Germanic origin; compare Low German krömeln, Dutch kruimelen
'crumble' also found in these entries:
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