cloister

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈklɔɪstər/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/ˈklɔɪstɚ/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(kloistər)


WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
clois•ter /ˈklɔɪstɚ/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. Architecturea covered walk, esp. in a church or other religious building, opening onto a courtyard.
  2. Architecturea courtyard bordered with such walks.
  3. a place for religious people to live, such as a monastery.

v. [+ oneself]
  1. to keep away from the world in a monastery:She cloistered herself in the convent.
  2. to shut away from the world and live apart:cloistered himself in his library with his books.
See -clos-.
WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
clois•ter  (kloistər),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. Architecturea covered walk, esp. in a religious institution, having an open arcade or colonnade usually opening onto a courtyard.
  2. Architecturea courtyard, esp. in a religious institution, bordered with such walks.
  3. a place of religious seclusion, as a monastery or convent.
  4. any quiet, secluded place.
  5. life in a monastery or convent.

v.t. 
  1. to confine in a monastery or convent.
  2. to confine in retirement;
    seclude.
  3. to furnish with a cloister or covered walk.
  4. to convert into a monastery or convent.
cloister•less, adj. 
cloister•like′, adj. 
  • Latin claustrum barrier (Late Latin: enclosed place); see claustrum)
  • Anglo-French, Old French, blend of, blended cloison partition (see cloisonné) and clostre (
  • Middle English cloistre 1250–1300
    • 3.See corresponding entry in Unabridged abbey, priory.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
cloister /ˈklɔɪstə/ n
  1. a covered walk, usually around a quadrangle in a religious institution, having an open arcade or colonnade on the inside and a wall on the outside
  2. (sometimes plural) a place of religious seclusion, such as a monastery
  3. life in a monastery or convent
vb
  1. (transitive) to confine or seclude in or as if in a monastery
Etymology: 13th Century: from Old French cloistre, from Medieval Latin claustrum monastic cell, from Latin: bolt, barrier, from claudere to close; influenced in form by Old French cloison partition
'cloister' also found in these entries (note: many are not synonyms or translations):
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