chuck

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈtʃʌk/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/tʃʌk/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(chuk)


WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
chuck1 /tʃʌk/USA pronunciation   v. [+ object]
  1. to toss;
    throw:Chuck the ball over here!
  2. to throw away;
    throw out:Can't we chuck all these old boxes?
  3. to resign from: He's chucked his job and gone to live in the mountains.
  4. to pat or tap lightly, as under the chin:I chucked my niece under her chin.

n. [countable]
  1. a light pat or tap:a little chuck under the chin.
  2. a toss;
    pitch.

chuck2 /tʃʌk/USA pronunciation   n. 
  1. Food the cut of beef between the neck and the shoulder blade:[uncountable]ground chuck for hamburgers.
  2. [countable] a block or log used as a chock.

chuck4 /tʃʌk/USA pronunciation   n. [uncountable]
  1. Dialect Termsfood;
    provisions:A chuck wagon was a wagon that carried the cowboys' food.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
chuck1  (chuk),USA pronunciation v.t. 
  1. to toss;
    throw with a quick motion, usually a short distance.
  2. Informal Termsto resign from;
    relinquish;
    give up:He's chucked his job.
  3. to pat or tap lightly, as under the chin.
  4. Informal Termsto eject (a person) from a public place (often fol. by out):They chucked him from the bar.
  5. Slang Termsto vomit;
    upchuck.
  6. British Termschuck it, stop it;
    shut up.

n. 
  1. a light pat or tap, as under the chin.
  2. a toss or pitch;
    a short throw.
  3. a sudden jerk or change in direction.
  • origin, originally uncertain 1575–85
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged fling, pitch, heave, hurl.

chuck2  (chuk),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. Foodthe cut of beef between the neck and the shoulder blade. See diag. under  beef. 
  2. a block or log used as a chock.
  3. [Mach.]
    • Mechanical Engineeringa device for centering and clamping work in a lathe or other machine tool.
    • Mechanical Engineeringa device for holding a drill bit.

v.t. 
  1. Mechanical Engineering[Mach.]to hold or secure with a chuck.
  • variant of chock. See chunk1 1665–75

chuck3  (chuk),USA pronunciation v.t., v.i. 
  1. to cluck.

n. 
  1. a clucking sound.
  2. [Archaic.](used as a term of endearment):my love, my chuck.
  • Middle English chuk, expressive word, apparently imitative 1350–1400

chuck4  (chuk),USA pronunciation n. [Western U.S. Slang.]
  1. Dialect Termsfood;
    provisions.
  • special use of chuck2 1840–50

chuck5  (chuk),USA pronunciation n. [Informal.]
  1. Informal Termswoodchuck.
  • by shortening

chuck6  (chuk),USA pronunciation n. [Canadian Slang.]
  1. Canada, British Termswater.
  2. Canada, British Termsany body of water.
  • Nootka č’aʔak water, reinforced by Lower Chinook ł-čuq water
  • Chinook Jargon, probably
  • 1855–60

Chuck  (chuk),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. a male given name, form of  Charles. 
  2. Slang Terms[Usually Disparaging.]
    • a white man.
    • white society, culture, and values.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
chuck /tʃʌk/ vb (mainly tr)
  1. informal to throw
  2. to pat affectionately, esp under the chin
  3. sometimes followed by in or up: informal to give up; reject: he chucked up his job, she chucked her boyfriend
  4. (intransitive) usually followed by up: slang chiefly US to vomit
  5. chuck off atAustral NZ informal to abuse or make fun of
n
  1. a throw or toss
  2. a playful pat under the chin
  3. the chuckinformal dismissal

See also chuck in, chuck outEtymology: 16th Century: of unknown origin
chuck /tʃʌk/ n
  1. Also called: chuck steak a cut of beef extending from the neck to the shoulder blade
  2. Also called: three jaw chuck a device that holds a workpiece in a lathe or tool in a drill, having a number of adjustable jaws geared to move in unison to centralize the workpiece or tool
Etymology: 17th Century: variant of chock
chuck /tʃʌk/ n Canadian W coast
  1. a large body of water
Etymology: 19th Century: from Chinook Jargon, from Nootka chauk
'chuck' also found in these entries:
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