canvass

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈkænvəs/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/ˈkænvəs/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(kanvəs)


WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
can•vass /ˈkænvəs/USA pronunciation   v. 
  1. Governmentto ask for votes, etc., from (a district): [+ object]She canvassed her friends and the people on her block.[no object;  sometimes: ~ + for + object]She was canvassing for votes most of the week.

n. [countable]
  1. Governmentan act of asking for votes, views, etc.:a quick canvass of voters leaving the polls.
can•vass•er, n. [countable]

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
can•vass  (kanvəs),USA pronunciation v.t. 
  1. Governmentto solicit votes, subscriptions, opinions, or the like from.
  2. Governmentto examine carefully;
    investigate by inquiry;
    discuss;
    debate.

v.i. 
  1. Governmentto solicit votes, opinions, or the like.

n. 
  1. Governmenta soliciting of votes, orders, or the like.
  2. Governmenta campaign for election to government office.
  3. Governmentclose inspection;
    scrutiny.
canvass•er, n. 
  • 1500–10; origin, originally spelling, spelled variant of canvas, as a verb, verbal; sense "discuss'' apparently development of the earlier senses "toss in a canvas sheet,'' "harshly criticize''; sense "solicit votes'' obscurely derived
    • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged . analyze, scrutinize, explore.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
canvass /ˈkænvəs/ vb
  1. to solicit votes, orders, advertising, etc, from
  2. to determine the feelings and opinions of (voters before an election, etc), esp by conducting a survey
  3. to investigate (something) thoroughly, esp by discussion or debate
  4. chiefly US to inspect (votes) officially to determine their validity
n
  1. a solicitation of opinions, votes, sales orders, etc
  2. close inspection; scrutiny
Etymology: 16th Century: probably from obsolete sense of canvas (to toss someone in a canvas sheet, hence, to harass, criticize); the development of current senses is unexplained

ˈcanvasser n ˈcanvassing n
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