buckle

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈbʌkəl/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/ˈbʌkəl/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(bukəl)

Inflections of 'buckle' (v): (⇒ conjugate)
buckles
v 3rd person singular
buckling
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."
buckled
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed."
buckled
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
buck•le /ˈbʌkəl/USA pronunciation   n., v.,  -led, -ling. 
n. [countable]
  1. a piece of metal attached to one end of a belt or strap, used for fastening to the other end of the same strap or to another strap:His brass belt buckle flashed in the light.

v. 
  1. to fasten with a buckle or buckles: [+ object]Buckle your seat belt.[+ on + object]The officer buckled on his pistol.[+ object + on]He buckled his pistol on.
  2. to bend because of fatigue:[no object]Suddenly my knees buckled.
  3. to bend, curl, or collapse suddenly because of heat or pressure: [no object]When the earthquake hit, several highways buckled.[+ object]The intense heat buckled the road.
  4. buckle down, [no object] to set to work with strength and determination:Just buckle down and practice.
  5. buckle under, [no object] to surrender, give way, or yield to another:The stubborn worker finally began to buckle under.
  6. buckle up, [no object] to fasten one's belt, seat belt, or buckles:Please buckle up now; we're about to land.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
buck•le  (bukəl),USA pronunciation n., v.,  -led, -ling. 
n. 
  1. a clasp consisting of a rectangular or curved rim with one or more movable tongues, fixed to one end of a belt or strap, used for fastening to the other end of the same strap or to another strap.
  2. any similar contrivance used for such purposes.
  3. Jewelryan ornament of metal, beads, etc., of similar appearance.
  4. a bend, bulge, or kink, as in a board or saw blade.

v.t. 
  1. to fasten with a buckle or buckles:Buckle your seat belt.
  2. to shrivel, by applying heat or pressure;
    bend;
    curl.
  3. to prepare (oneself ) for action;
    apply (oneself ) vigorously to something.
  4. to bend, warp, or cause to give way suddenly, as with heat or pressure.

v.i. 
  1. to close or fasten with a buckle:Grandmother always wore shoes that buckled.
  2. to prepare oneself or apply oneself:The student buckled to the lesson.
  3. to bend, warp, bulge, or collapse:The bridge buckled in the storm.
  4. to yield, surrender, or give way to another (often fol. by under):She refused to take the medicine, but buckled under when the doctor told her to.
  5. buckle down, to set to work with vigor;
    concentrate on one's work:He was by nature a daydreamer and found it hard to buckle down.
  6. buckle up, to fasten one's belt, seat belt, or buckles:She won't start the car until we've all buckled up.
buckle•less, adj. 
  • Latin buc(c)ula cheekpiece (of a helmet), strip of wood, etc., resembling a cheekpiece, equivalent. to bucc(a) cheek + -ula -ule
  • Anglo-French bo(u)cle, bucle
  • Middle English bocle 1300–50
    • 8.See corresponding entry in Unabridged sag, bulge, twist;
      crumple, collapse.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
buckle /ˈbʌkəl/ n
  1. a clasp for fastening together two loose ends, esp of a belt or strap, usually consisting of a frame with an attached movable prong
  2. an ornamental representation of a buckle, as on a shoe
  3. a kink, bulge, or other distortion: a buckle in a railway track
vb
  1. to fasten or be fastened with a buckle
  2. to bend or cause to bend out of shape, esp as a result of pressure or heat
Etymology: 14th Century: from Old French bocle, from Latin buccula a little cheek, hence, cheek strap of a helmet, from bucca cheek
'buckle' also found in these entries:
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