blazing

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈbleɪzɪŋ/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/ˈbleɪzɪŋ/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(blāzing)

From the verb blaze: (⇒ conjugate)
blazing is: Click the infinitive to see all available inflections
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
blaz•ing /ˈbleɪzɪŋ/USA pronunciation   adj. 
  1. of tremendous intensity, heat, color, or force:blazing temperatures.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
blaz•ing  (blāzing),USA pronunciation adj. 
  1. burning brightly and with great heat, force, etc.
  2. of tremendous intensity or fervor:a performance of blazing ferocity.
blazing•ly, adv. 
  • 1350–1400; Middle English; see blaze1, -ing2

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
blaze1 /bleɪz/USA pronunciation   n., v.,  blazed, blaz•ing. 
n. [countable]
  1. a bright flame or fire:A small blaze started in the kitchen.
  2. a very bright glow of color or light:a blaze of jewels.
  3. a sudden, intense outburst, as of passion or excitement :[usually singular: a + ~]a blaze of anger.

v. [no object]
  1. to burn brightly: The bonfire blazed for hours.
  2. to shine brightly, like a flame:The car headlights blazed ahead.
  3. to flare suddenly (as with intense emotion):Her eyes blazed when she saw us cheating.
  4. blaze away, [no object] to shoot steadily:blazed away with their machine guns.

blaze2 /bleɪz/USA pronunciation   n., v.,  blazed, blaz•ing. 
n. [countable]
  1. a mark made on a tree, as with paint, to indicate a trail or boundary.
  2. Zoologya white area down the center of the face of a horse, cow, etc.

v. [+ object]
  1. to indicate or mark with blazes: to blaze a trail.
  2. to lead the way in forming or finding:blazed the way for space travel.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
blaze1  (blāz),USA pronunciation n., v.,  blazed, blaz•ing. 
n. 
  1. a bright flame or fire:the welcome blaze of the hearth.
  2. a bright, hot gleam or glow:the blaze of day.
  3. a sparkling brightness:a blaze of jewels.
  4. a sudden, intense outburst, as of fire, passion, or fury:to unleash a blaze of pent-up emotions; a blaze of glory.
  5. blazes, [Informal.]hell:Go to blazes!

v.i. 
  1. to burn brightly (sometimes fol. by away, up, forth):The bonfire blazed away for hours. The dry wood blazed up at the touch of a match.
  2. to shine like flame (sometimes fol. by forth):Their faces blazed with enthusiasm.
  3. to burn with intense feeling or passion (sometimes fol. by up):He blazed up at the insult.
  4. to shoot steadily or continuously (usually fol. by away):The contestants blazed away at the clay pigeons.
  5. to be brilliantly conspicuous.
  • bef. 1000; Middle English, Old English blase torch, flame; cognate with Middle High German blas torch
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged See  flame. 

blaze2  (blāz),USA pronunciation n., v.,  blazed, blaz•ing. 
n. 
  1. a spot or mark made on a tree, as by painting or notching or by chipping away a piece of the bark, to indicate a trail or boundary.
  2. Zoologya white area down the center of the face of a horse, cow, etc.

v.t. 
  1. to mark with blazes:to blaze a trail.
  2. to lead in forming or finding (a new method, course, etc.):His research in rocketry blazed the way for space travel.
  • akin to Old Norse blesi, Dutch bles, German Blässe white mark on a beast's face, and to German blass pale 1655–65

blaze3  (blāz),USA pronunciation v.t.,  blazed, blaz•ing. 
  1. to make known;
    proclaim;
    publish:Headlines blazed the shocking news.
  2. [Obs.]to blow, as from a trumpet.
  • Middle Dutch; cognate with Old Norse blāsa to blow. See blast
  • Middle English blasen 1350–1400

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
blaze /bleɪz/ n
  1. a strong fire or flame
  2. a very bright light or glare
  3. an outburst (of passion, acclaim, patriotism, etc)
  4. brilliance; brightness
vb (intransitive)
  1. to burn fiercely
  2. to shine brightly
  3. (often followed by up) to become stirred, as with anger or excitement
  4. (usually followed by away) to shoot continuously

See also blazesEtymology: Old English blæse
blaze /bleɪz/ n
  1. a mark, usually indicating a path, made on a tree, esp by chipping off the bark
  2. a light-coloured marking on the face of a domestic animal, esp a horse
vb (transitive)
  1. to indicate or mark (a tree, path, etc) with a blaze
  2. blaze a trailto explore new territories, areas of knowledge, etc, in such a way that others can follow
Etymology: 17th Century: probably from Middle Low German bles white marking; compare blemish
blaze /bleɪz/ vb
  1. (transitive) often followed by abroad: to make widely known; proclaim
Etymology: 14th Century: from Middle Dutch blāsen, from Old High German blāsan; related to Old Norse blāsa
'blazing' also found in these entries:
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