beginning

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/bɪˈgɪnɪŋ/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/bɪˈgɪnɪŋ/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(bi gining)

From the verb begin: (⇒ conjugate)
beginning is: Click the infinitive to see all available inflections
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
be•gin•ning /bɪˈgɪnɪŋ/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. an act of starting:the beginning of hostilities.
  2. the point at which anything starts:[usually singular]Register for my course at the beginning of the term.
  3. the first part: the beginning of the book.
  4. Often, beginnings. [plural] an initial or basic stage: The beginnings of modern chemistry are found in the works of the alchemists.
  5. [usually singular] origin;
    source: A misunderstanding was the beginning of their quarrel.

adj.  [before a noun]
  1. basic or introductory: beginning Spanish.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
be•gin•ning  (bi gining),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. an act or circumstance of entering upon an action or state:the beginning of hostilities.
  2. the point of time or space at which anything begins:the beginning of the Christian era; the beginning of the route.
  3. the first part:the beginning of the book; the beginning of the month.
  4. Often,  beginnings. the initial stage or part of anything:the beginnings of science.
  5. origin;
    source;
    first cause:A misunderstanding about the rent was the beginning of their quarrel.

adj. 
  1. just formed:a beginning company.
  2. first;
    opening:the beginning chapters of a book.
  3. basic or introductory:beginning Spanish.
  4. learning the fundamentals:a beginning swimmer.
  • Middle English beginnung, -ing. See begin, -ing1 1175–1225
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged initiation, inauguration, inception.
    • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged start, commencement, outset, onset, arising, emergence.
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged ending.
    • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged end.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
beginning /bɪˈɡɪnɪŋ/ n
  1. a start; commencement
  2. (often plural) a first or early part or stage
  3. the place where or time when something starts
  4. an origin; source
WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
be•gin /bɪˈgɪn/USA pronunciation   v.,  -gan/-ˈgæn/USA pronunciation  -gun/-ˈgʌn/USA pronunciation  -gin•ning. 
  1. to proceed to the first part of (an action);
    start: [no object]The movie begins at 6 p.m.[+ object]We'd like you to begin work tomorrow.[+ to + verb]I began to feel dizzy.[+ verb-ing]began crying after the movie started.
  2. to come into existence;
    arise: [no object]The custom of women wearing shorter skirts began during the war.[+ as + object]The restaurant began as a small cafeteria.[+ object + as]He began his political career as a state senator.
  3. [+ with + object&rcub ;
    to have a first part: "Cicero'' begins with a C.
  4. [+ to + verb;  used with a negative word or phrase, or in questions] to succeed to the slightest extent or amount : The financial aid won't begin to cover expenses.
Idioms
  1. to begin with, in the first place;
    the first reason (is):We need this book. To begin with, there isn't much written about the subject.

    In the first meaning of begin, it is possible to use the -ing form or the to + verb (infinitive) form after it: She stood up and began playing or to play the trumpet. Although both are possible, there is a slight difference in meaning. With the -ing form we expect the trumpet playing to go on for a while, and assume that in the past (perhaps) there has been some playing. With the to + verb form there is a possibility that her playing might soon be stopped, interrupted, or cut short;
    the playing may not continue for quite so long.
    begin, commence, initiate, start (when followed by a noun or verb in the -ing form) refers to setting into motion or progress something that continues for some time. begin is the common term: She began knitting a sweater in March. commence is a more formal word, often suggesting a more prolonged or complicated beginning: The lawyers commenced court proceedings against my client. initiate implies an active and often clever or exciting first action in a new field: The scientists initiated a new procedure for deriving more energy from the atom. start means to make a first move or set out on a course of action: The workers started paving the street.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
be•gin  (bi gin),USA pronunciation  v.,  be•gan, be•gun, be•gin•ning. 
v.i. 
  1. to proceed to perform the first or earliest part of some action;
    commence;
    start:The story begins with their marriage.
  2. to come into existence;
    arise;
    originate:The custom began during the Civil War.

v.t. 
  1. to proceed to perform the first or earliest part of (some action):Begin the job tomorrow.
  2. to originate;
    be the originator of:civic leaders who began the reform movement.
  3. to succeed to the slightest extent in (fol. by an infinitive):The money won't even begin to cover expenses.
  • Middle English beginnen, Old English beginnan, equivalent. to be- be- + -ginnan to begin, perh. origin, originally to open, akin to yawn bef. 1000
    • 3.See corresponding entry in Unabridged Begin, commence, initiate, start (when followed by noun or gerund) refer to setting into motion or progress something that continues for some time.
      Begin is the common term:to begin knitting a sweater.Commence is a more formal word, often suggesting a more prolonged or elaborate beginning:to commence proceedings in court.Initiate implies an active and often ingenious first act in a new field:to initiate a new procedure.Start means to make a first move or to set out on a course of action:to start paving a street.
    • 4.See corresponding entry in Unabridged institute, inaugurate, initiate.
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged end.

Be•gin  (bāgin),USA pronunciation n.  Me•na•chem  (bāgin),USA pronunciation 1913–92, Israeli political leader, born in Poland: prime minister 1977–83;
Nobel peace prize 1978.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
begin /bɪˈɡɪn/ vb ( -gins, -ginning, -gan, -gun)
  1. to start or cause to start (something or to do something)
  2. to bring or come into being for the first time; arise or originate
  3. to start to say or speak
  4. (used with a negative) to have the least capacity (to do something): he couldn't begin to compete with her
  5. to begin within the first place
Etymology: Old English beginnan; related to Old High German biginnan, Gothic duginnan
'beginning' also found in these entries:
Collocations: a [new, fresh, promising] beginning, beginning [Spanish, electronics, programming], was an auspicious beginning (to), more...

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