WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
and  (and;
unstressed ənd, ən, or, esp. after t, n, or d, n), conj. 
  1. (used to connect words, phrases, or clauses) with, as well as, or in addition to:pens and pencils.
  2. added to;
    plus: 2 and 2 are 4.
  3. then;
    afterwards;
    after that: He finished and went to bed.
  4. also;
    at the same time: to sleep and dream.
  5. Informal. (used instead of to between two verbs) to: Try and do it (= Try to do it).
  6. (used to introduce a result of what comes before it) then;
    as a result: Study hard and you will pass this test (= If you study hard, then you will pass this test).
  7. but;
    on the contrary: He tried to run five miles and couldn't.
  8. (used to suggest or imply that there are differences in things that have the same name): There are bargains and bargains, so watch out. (= Some things are truly bargains, but other things, that seem like bargains, are not really so.)

n. [countable]
  1. [usually plural] an added or extra condition, rule, or item: She clearly succeeded, no ifs, ands, or buts about it.
Idioms
  1. Idioms and so forth or so on, and more of the same or similar kind:first, second, third, and so forth.


WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
so1 /soʊ/USA pronunciation   adv. 
  1. (after having shown or described something) in the manner indicated or understood:Do it so.
  2. (after a story or description of something) in that or this manner;
    thus:o it turned out.
  3. in the condition just mentioned:It is broken and has long been so (= It has long been broken.)
  4. (when the speaker and listener are aware of the circumstances) to the extent indicated;
    to such a degree or amount:Do not walk so fast.
  5. Informal Termsvery or extremely:I'm so happy.
  6. very greatly:My head aches so!
  7. (used before an adverb or an adverbial clause and followed by as) to such a degree or extent;
    as:So far as I know, she has always been trustworthy.
  8. having the purpose of:a speech so commemorating the victory.
  9. hence;
    therefore;
    for that reason:She was ill, and so stayed home (= and because she was ill, she stayed home).
  10. (used after a clause or statement, and before a subject and auxiliary verb, to express strong emphasis or agreement with the clause or statement) most certainly:I said I would come, and so I will. "You've forgotten your hat.''—"Ah, yes, so I have.''
  11. (used to contradict a previous statement, often with special stress) indeed;
    truly;
    too:"You weren't at the party last night.'' —"I was so !''
  12. (used after a clause, and before an auxiliary verb and its subject, to suggest that the same thing is to be done as in the first clause) also;
    likewise or correspondingly;
    too:If he is going, then so am I.
  13. in such manner as to follow or result from:As he learned, so did he teach.
  14. in the way that follows;
    in this way:The audience was seated, and so the speech began.
  15. in such way as to end in:So live your life that old age will bring you no regrets.
  16. then;
    after that;
    subsequently:So, shortly afterward, Alice met the queen.

conj. 
  1. in order that:[~ (+ that)]He wore warm clothes so he wouldn't be cold in the winter snows.
  2. with the result that:He wasn't feeling well so he went to lie down on the couch.

pron. 
  1. such as has been stated:to be good and stay so.
  2. something that is about or near the persons or things in question, as in number or amount:Of the original twelve, five or so remain.

interj. 
  1. (used as to show surprise, shock, etc., according to the situation):So, it's Mr. Holmes! At last we meet! (= surprise or joy). "Come on, get up, the company's here.''— "So?'' (= indifference).

adj. [be + ~]
  1. true as stated or reported:Say it isn't so.
Usage. The words so and very are sometimes used similarly:Everything is very expensive. Everything is so expensive.If a clause beginning with that follows, so is used, not very:Everything is so expensive that families cannot afford the necessities.
WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
and  (and; unstressed ənd, ən, or, esp. after a homorganic consonant, n),USA pronunciation  conj. 
  1. (used to connect grammatically coordinate words, phrases, or clauses) along or together with;
    as well as;
    in addition to;
    besides;
    also;
    moreover:pens and pencils.
  2. added to;
    plus:2 and 2 are 4.
  3. then:He read for an hour and went to bed.
  4. also, at the same time:to sleep and dream.
  5. then again;
    repeatedly:He coughed and coughed.
  6. (used to imply different qualities in things having the same name):There are bargains and bargains, so watch out.
  7. (used to introduce a sentence, implying continuation) also;
    then:And then it happened.
  8. [Informal.]to (used between two finite verbs):Try and do it. Call and see if she's home yet.
  9. (used to introduce a consequence or conditional result):He felt sick and decided to lie down for a while. Say one more word about it and I'll scream.
  10. but;
    on the contrary:He tried to run five miles and couldn't. They said they were about to leave and then stayed for two more hours.
  11. (used to connect alternatives):He felt that he was being forced to choose between his career and his family.
  12. (used to introduce a comment on the preceding clause):They don't like each other--and with good reason.
  13. [Archaic.]if:and you please.Cf. an2.
  14. and so forth, and the like;
    and others;
    et cetera:We discussed traveling, sightseeing, and so forth.
  15. and so on, and more things or others of a similar kind;
    and the like:It was a summer filled with parties, picnics, and so on.

n. 
  1. an added condition, stipulation, detail, or particular:He accepted the job, no ands or buts about it.
  2. Philosophyconjunction (def. 5b).
  • bef. 900; Middle English; Old English and, ond; cognate with Old Saxon, Old High German ant, Old Frisian, Gothic and, Icelandic and-; akin to German und, Dutch en, Sanskrit anti
    Both and and but, and to a lesser extent or and so, are common as transitional words at the beginnings of sentences in all types of speech and writing:General Jackson thought the attack would come after darkness. And he was right.Any objection to this practice probably stems from the overuse of such sentences by inexperienced writers. When one of these words begins a sentence or an independent clause within a sentence, it is not followed by a comma unless the comma is one of a pair setting off a parenthetical element that follows:John is popular, and he seems to be well adjusted. But, appearances to the contrary, he is often depressed.See also  and/or, et cetera, try. 

AND  (and),USA pronunciation n. 
  • Computinga Boolean operator that returns a positive result when both operands are positive.

  • WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
    so1  (sō),USA pronunciation adv. 
    1. in the way or manner indicated, described, or implied:Do it so.
    2. in that or this manner or fashion;
      thus:So it turned out.
    3. in the aforesaid state or condition:It is broken and has long been so.
    4. to the extent or degree indicated or suggested:Do not walk so fast.
    5. Informal Termsvery or extremely:I'm so sad.
    6. very greatly:My head aches so!
    7. (used before an adverb or an adverbial clause and fol. by as) to such a degree or extent:so far as I know.
    8. having the purpose of:a speech so commemorating the victory.
    9. for this or that reason;
      hence;
      therefore:She is ill, and so cannot come to the party.
    10. (used as an affirmative to emphasize or confirm a previous statement) most certainly:I said I would come, and so I will.
    11. (used as an emphatic affirmative to contradict a previous statement) indeed;
      truly;
      too:I was so at the party!
    12. likewise or correspondingly;
      also;
      too:If he is going, then so am I.
    13. in such manner as to follow or result from:As he learned, so did he teach.
    14. in the way that follows;
      in this way:The audience was seated, and so the famous speech began.
    15. in the way that precedes;
      in that way:So ended the speech, and the listeners arose and cheered.
    16. in such way as to end in:So live your life that old age will bring you no regrets.
    17. then;
      subsequently:and so to bed.
    18. so much as, even:He doesn't so much as say hello to me.
    19. so as: 
      • with the result or purpose:to turn up the volume of the radio so as to drown out the noise from the next apartment.
      • [Older Use.]provided that:I like any flower, just so as it's real.
    20. only or  just so many, being a limited or small number or amount:I can eat only so many pieces of fruit.
    21. only or  just so much, being a limited amount or quantity;
      up to a certain point or maximum:I can eat only so much fruit; just so much that one can do in such a case.
    22. so to speak. See  speak (def. 20).
    23. so what? See  what (def. 17).

    conj. 
    1. in order that (often fol. by that):Check carefully, so any mistakes will be caught.
    2. with the result that (often fol. by that):He checked carefully, so that the mistakes were caught.
    3. on the condition that;
      if.

    pron. 
    1. such as has been stated:to be good and stay so.
    2. something that is about or near the persons or things in question, as in number or amount:Of the original twelve, five or so remain.
    3. so much: 
      • something, as an amount or cost, that is not specified or determined:The carpeting is priced at so much per yard.
      • all that is or needs to be said or done:So much for the preliminaries, let's get down to the real issues.

    interj. 
    1. (used as an exclamation of surprise, shock, discovery, inquiry, indifference, etc., according to the manner of utterance.)

    adj. 
    1. true as stated or reported;
      conforming with reality or the fact:Say it isn't so.
    • bef. 900; Middle English; Old English swā; cognate with Dutch zoo, German so, Gothic swa
      • 9.See corresponding entry in Unabridged See  therefore. 
      5. The intensive so meaning "very or extremely'' (Everything's so expensive these days) occurs chiefly in informal speech. In writing and formal speech, intensive so is most often followed by a completing that clause:Everything is so expensive that some families must struggle just to survive. 24, 25. The conjunction so (often followed by that) introduces clauses both of purpose (We ordered our tickets early so that we could get good seats) and of result (The river had frozen during the night so people walked across it all the next day). In formal speech and writing, so that is somewhat more common than so in clauses of purpose. Otherwise, either so or so that is standard.Like and, but1, and or, so can occur as a transitional word at the beginning of a sentence:So all our hard work finally brought results.See also  as1, and, but1. 

    so2  (sō),USA pronunciation n. [Music.]
    1. sol1.

    So., 
    1. GeographySouth.
    2. Southern.

    S.O., 
    1. Signal Officer.
    2. Special Order.
    3. Standing Order.

    s.o., 
    1. seller's option.
    2. shipping order.

    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
    so /səʊ/ adv
    1. (followed by an adjective or adverb and a correlative clause often introduced by that) to such an extent: the river is so dirty that it smells
    2. (used with a negative; it replaces the first as in an equative comparison) to the same extent as: she is not so old as you
    3. (intensifier): it's so lovely, I love you so
    4. in the state or manner expressed or implied: they're happy and will remain so
    5. (not used with a negative; followed by an auxiliary verb or do, have, or be used as main verbs) also; likewise: I can speak Spanish and so can you
    6. informal indeed: used to contradict a negative statement: You didn't tell the truth. I did so!
    7. archaic provided that
    8. and so on, and so forthand continuing similarly
    9. or soapproximately: fifty or so people came to see me
    10. so be itused to express agreement or resignation
    11. so mucha certain degree or amount (of)
    12. a lot (of): it's just so much nonsense
    13. so much forno more can or need be said about
    14. used to express contempt for something that has failed
    conj (subordinating; often followed by that)
    1. in order (that): to die so that you might live
    2. with the consequence (that): he was late home, so that there was trouble
    3. so as ⇒ (takes an infinitive) in order (to): to slim so as to lose weight
    sentence connector
    1. in consequence; hence: she wasn't needed, so she left
    2. thereupon; and then: and so we ended up in France
    3. so what!informal what importance does that have?
    pron
    1. used to substitute for a clause or sentence, which may be understood: you'll stop because I said so
    adj
    1. used with is, was, etc: factual; true: it can't be so
    interj
    1. an exclamation of agreement, surprise, etc
    Etymology: Old English swā; related to Old Norse svā, Old High German sō, Dutch zoo
    USAGE
    In formal English, so is not used as a conjunction, to indicate either purpose (he left by a back door so he could avoid photographers) or result (the project was abandoned so his services were no longer needed). In the former case to or in order to should be used instead, and in the latter case and so or and therefore would be more acceptable. The expression so therefore should not be used

    so /səʊ/ n
    1. a variant spelling of soh
    'and so forth' also found in these entries (note: many are not synonyms or translations):
    Advertisements
    Advertisements

    Report an inappropriate ad.