abbreviate

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/əˈbriːvieɪt/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/əˈbriviˌeɪt/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(ə brēvē āt′)


Inflections of 'abbreviate' (v): (⇒ conjugate)
abbreviates
v 3rd person singular
abbreviating
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."
abbreviated
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed."
abbreviated
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked."

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
ab•bre•vi•ate /əˈbriviˌeɪt/USA pronunciation   v. [+ object], -at•ed, -at•ing. 
  1. to shorten (a word or phrase) by omitting letters so that the shortened form stands for the whole word or phrase:[usually: be + ~-ed + to]United Nations is frequently abbreviated to UN.
  2. to make briefer:He abbreviated his speech.
See -brev-.
WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
ab•bre•vi•ate  (ə brēvē āt′),USA pronunciation v.,  -at•ed, -at•ing. 
v.t. 
  1. to shorten (a word or phrase) by omitting letters, substituting shorter forms, etc., so that the shortened form can represent the whole word or phrase, as ft. for foot, ab. for about, R.I. for Rhode Island, NW for Northwest, or Xn for Christian.
  2. to reduce (anything) in length, duration, etc.;
    make briefer:to abbreviate a speech.

v.i. 
  1. to use abbreviations.
ab•brevi•a′tor, n. 
  • Late Latin abbreviātus shortened (past participle of abbreviāre), equivalent. to Latin ad- ad- + breviātus (brevi(s) short + -ātus -ate1)
  • late Middle English abbreviaten 1400–50
    See  shorten. 

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
abbreviate /əˈbriːvɪˌeɪt/ vb (transitive)
  1. to shorten (a word or phrase) by contraction or omission of some letters or words
  2. to cut short
Etymology: 15th Century: from the past participle of Late Latin abbreviāre, from Latin brevis brief
'abbreviate' also found in these entries:
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