WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
a pri•o•ri /ˌeɪ praɪˈɔraɪ, -ˈoʊraɪ/USA pronunciation   adj. 
  1. Philosophyfrom a general law to a particular instance;
    reasoning from cause to effect:a priori thinking.
  2. Philosophyexisting in the mind independent of experience;
    valid independently of observation:an a priori belief.
Compare a posteriori.
WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
a pri•o•ri  (ā′ prī ôrī, -ōrī, ā′ prē ôrē, -ōrē, ä′ prē ôrē, -ōrē),USA pronunciation 
  • Philosophyfrom a general law to a particular instance; valid independently of observation. Cf. a posteriori (def. 1).
  • Philosophyexisting in the mind prior to and independent of experience, as a faculty or character trait. Cf. a posteriori (def. 2).
  • Philosophynot based on prior study or examination;
    nonanalytic:an a priori judgment.
  • a•pri•or•i•ty  (ā′ prī ôrī, -ōrī, ā′ prē ôrē, -ōrē, ä′ prē ôrē, -ōrē),USA pronunciation n. 
    • Latin: literally, from the one before. See a-4, prior
    • 1645–55

    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
    a priori /eɪ praɪˈɔːraɪ; ɑː prɪˈɔːrɪ/ adj
    1. relating to or involving deductive reasoning from a general principle to the expected facts or effects
    2. known to be true independently of or in advance of experience of the subject matter; requiring no evidence for its validation or support
    Etymology: 18th Century: from Latin, literally: from the previous (that is, from cause to effect)

    apriority /ˌeɪpraɪˈɒrɪtɪ/ n
    'a priori' also found in these entries:
    Advertisements
    Advertisements

    Report an inappropriate ad.