Peck

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈpɛk/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/pɛk/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(pek)


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
Peck /pɛk/ n
  1. Gregory. 1916–2003, US film actor; his films include Keys of the Kingdom (1944), The Gunfighter (1950), The Big Country (1958), To Kill a Mockingbird (1963), The Omen (1976), and Other People's Money (1991)
WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
peck1 /pɛk/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. Weights and Measuresa unit of measurement for dry goods, equal to 8 quarts;
    the fourth part of a bushel, equal to 537.6 cubic inches (8.81 liters).
  2. Weights and Measuresa container for measuring this quantity.
  3. a considerable quantity:a peck of trouble.

peck2 /pɛk/USA pronunciation   v. 
  1. Birdsto strike or pierce with the beak, as a bird does: [+ object]The birds pecked a hole in the bag of seed.[no object]birds pecking at the ground.
  2. Birds to kiss (someone) lightly on the cheek:[+ object]She pecked him quickly on the cheek.
  3. peck at, [+ at + object]
    • to nibble at (food) without much interest:sat there pecking at his meal.
    • to nag:kept pecking at him to load the dishwasher.

n. [countable]
  1. a quick stroke, as in pecking.
  2. a quick, light kiss:a little peck on the cheek.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
peck1  (pek),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. Weights and Measuresa dry measure of 8 quarts;
    the fourth part of a bushel, equal to 537.6 cubic inches (8.81 liters).
  2. Weights and Measuresa container for measuring this quantity. Abbr.: pk, pk.
  3. a considerable quantity:a peck of trouble.
  • ?
  • Old French
  • Middle English pek 1250–1300

peck2  (pek),USA pronunciation v.t. 
  1. Birdsto strike or indent with the beak, as a bird does, or with some pointed instrument, esp. with quick, repeated movements.
  2. to make (a hole, puncture, etc.) by such strokes;
    pierce.
  3. Birdsto take (food) bit by bit, with or as with the beak.

v.i. 
  1. Birdsto make strokes with the beak or a pointed instrument.
  2. peck at: 
    • to nibble indifferently or unenthusiastically at (food).
    • to nag or carp at:Stop pecking at me, I'm doing the best I can.

n. 
  1. a quick stroke, as in pecking.
  2. a hole or mark made by or as by pecking.
  3. a quick, almost impersonal kiss:a peck on the cheek.
  4. Plant Diseases(in timber) incipient decay from fungi, occurring in isolated spots.
  5. pecks. Also,  peckings. [Slang.]food.
  • Middle Dutch pecken; akin to pick1
  • Middle English pecke 1300–50
    • 5.See corresponding entry in Unabridged a. pick at, poke at.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
peck /pɛk/ n
  1. a unit of dry measure equal to 8 quarts or one quarter of a bushel
  2. a container used for measuring this quantity
  3. a large quantity or number
Etymology: 13th Century: from Anglo-Norman, of uncertain origin
peck /pɛk/ vb
  1. when intr, sometimes followed by at: to strike with the beak or with a pointed instrument
  2. (transitive) sometimes followed by out: to dig (a hole) by pecking
  3. (transitive) (of birds) to pick up (corn, worms, etc) by pecking
  4. (intransitive) often followed by at: to nibble or pick (at one's food)
  5. informal to kiss (a person) quickly and lightly
  6. (intransitive) followed by at: to nag
n
  1. a quick light blow, esp from a bird's beak
  2. a mark made by such a blow
  3. informal a quick light kiss
Etymology: 14th Century: of uncertain origin; compare pick1, Middle Low German pekken to jab with the beak
'Peck' also found in these entries:
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