Dove

UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈdʌv/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/dʌv/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(n. duv; v. dōv)

From the verb dive: (⇒ conjugate)
dove is: Click the infinitive to see all available inflections
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed." (Mainly US)
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked." (Mainly US)

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
Dove /dʌv/ n
  1. the Dovea manifestation of the Holy Spirit (John 1:32)
WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
dove1 /dʌv/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. Birdsa bird of the pigeon family.
  2. Governmenta person who calls for peace or a more friendly national attitude toward enemies.

dove2 /doʊv/USA pronunciation   v. 
  1. a pt. of dive.

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2020
dive /daɪv/USA pronunciation   v.,  dived or dove/doʊv/USA pronunciation  dived, div•ing, n. 
v. 
  1. to plunge into water, esp. headfirst:[no object]He dove straight into the pool.
  2. to go underwater;
    submerge: [no object]The submarine dove quickly as the destroyer searched for it.[+ object]The captain dived his submarine deep to escape from the destroyers.
  3. to plunge, fall, or descend through the air:[no object]The acrobats dived into nets.
  4. Aeronautics(of an airplane) to (cause to) descend rapidly: [no object]The fighter plane dove straight at the target.[+ object]dived his plane straight at the enemy tanks.
  5. to jump or move quickly;
    dart:[no object]The spy dived quickly into a doorway.
  6. to enter deeply or plunge into a subject, activity, etc.:[no object]She dove straight into the new book and read all night.

n. [countable]
  1. an act or instance of diving.
  2. Sporta jump or plunge into water, esp. in a special way or posture.
  3. Aeronauticsthe steep, rapid descent of an airplane.
  4. a submerging, such as of a submarine.
  5. a dash, plunge, or lunge, as if throwing oneself at or into something:The police officer made a quick dive for the weapon.
  6. Informal Termsa dirty, cheap, disreputable bar or nightclub.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
dove1  (duv),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. Birdsany bird of the family Columbidae, esp. the smaller species with pointed tails. Cf. pigeon (def. 1).
  2. Birdsa pure white member of this species, used as a symbol of innocence, gentleness, tenderness, and peace.
  3. Religion(cap.) a symbol for the Holy Ghost.
  4. an innocent, gentle, or tender person.
  5. GovernmentAlso called  peace dove. a person, esp. one in public office, who advocates peace or a conciliatory national attitude. Cf. hawk1 (def. 4).
  6. See  dove color. 
  7. Astronomy(cap.) the constellation Columba.
dovelike′, dovish, adj. 
dovish•ness, n. 
  • 1150–1200; Middle English; Old English dūfe- (in dūfedoppa dip-diver); cognate with Dutch duif, German Taube, Old Norse dūfa, Gothic dūbo, origin, originally a diver

dove2  (dōv),USA pronunciation v. 
  1. a pt. of  dive. 

Dove  (duv),USA pronunciation  n. 
  1. BiographicalArthur, 1880–1946, U.S. painter.
  2. BiographicalRita, born 1952, U.S. poet and educator: U.S. poet laureate 1993.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2020
dive  (dīv),USA pronunciation v.,  dived  or dove, dived, div•ing, n. 
v.i. 
  1. to plunge into water, esp. headfirst.
  2. to go below the surface of the water, as a submarine.
  3. to plunge, fall, or descend through the air, into the earth, etc.:The acrobats dived into nets.
  4. Aeronautics(of an airplane) to descend rapidly.
  5. to penetrate suddenly into something, as with the hand:to dive into one's purse.
  6. to dart:to dive into a doorway.
  7. to enter deeply or plunge into a subject, activity, etc.

v.t. 
  1. to cause to plunge, submerge, or descend.
  2. to insert quickly;
    plunge:He dived his hand into his pocket.

n. 
  1. an act or instance of diving.
  2. Sporta jump or plunge into water, esp. in a prescribed way from a diving board.
  3. Aeronauticsthe vertical or nearly vertical descent of an airplane at a speed surpassing the possible speed of the same plane in level flight.
  4. a submerging, as of a submarine or skindiver.
  5. a dash, plunge, or lunge, as if throwing oneself at or into something:He made a dive for the football.
  6. a sudden or sharp decline, as in stock prices.
  7. Informal Termsa dingy or disreputable bar or nightclub.
  8. Sport[Boxing.]a false show of being knocked out, usually in a bout whose result has been prearranged:to take a dive in an early round.
  • bef. 900; Middle English diven to dive, dip, Old English dȳfan to dip (causative of dūfan to dive, sink); cognate with Old Norse dȳfa dip, German taufen to baptize; akin to dip
    Both dived and dove are standard as the past tense of dive. Dived, historically the older form, is somewhat more common in edited writing, but dove occurs there so frequently that it also must be considered standard:The rescuer dove into 20 feet of icy water.Dove is an Americanism that probably developed by analogy with alternations like drive, drove and ride, rode. It is the more common form in speech in the northern United States and in Canada, and its use seems to be spreading. The past participle of dive is always dived.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
dove /dʌv/ n
  1. any of various birds of the family Columbidae, having a heavy body, small head, short legs, and long pointed wings: order Columbiformes. They are typically smaller than pigeons
  2. a person opposed to war
  3. a gentle or innocent person: used as a term of endearment
  4. a greyish-brown colour
  5. (as adjective): dove walls
Etymology: Old English dūfe (unattested except as a feminine proper name); related to Old Saxon dūbva, Old High German tūba

ˈdoveˌlike adj
Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::
dive /daɪv/ vb (dives, diving, dived) ( US dove, dived)(mainly intr)
  1. to plunge headfirst into water
  2. (of a submarine, swimmer, etc) to submerge under water
  3. (also tr) to fly (an aircraft) in a steep nose-down descending path, or (of an aircraft) to fly in such a path
  4. to rush, go, or reach quickly, as in a headlong plunge: he dived for the ball
  5. (also tr; followed by in or into) to dip or put (one's hand) quickly or forcefully (into)
  6. usually followed by in or into: to involve oneself (in something), as in eating food
n
  1. a headlong plunge into water, esp one of several formalized movements executed as a sport
  2. an act or instance of diving
  3. a steep nose-down descent of an aircraft
  4. slang a disreputable or seedy bar or club
  5. slang the act of a boxer pretending to be knocked down or out
Etymology: Old English dӯfan; related to Old Norse dӯfa to dip, Frisian dīvi; see deep, dip
'Dove' also found in these entries (note: many are not synonyms or translations):
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