too

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈtuː/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/tu/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(to̅o̅)


WordReference Collins English Usage © 2020
too
Too can be an adverb or a grading adverb.
used as an adverb
You use too as an adverb to show that what has just been said applies to or includes someone or something else.
Of course, you're a teacher too, aren't you?
Hey, where are you from? Brooklyn? Me too!
used as a grading adverb
You use too in front of an adjective or adverb to say that an amount or degree of a quality is more than is needed or wanted.
By then he was far too tall for his little bed.
I realized my mistake too late.
Don't use ‘very’ in front of too. Don't say, for example, ‘The hat was very too small for her’. Say ‘The hat was much too small for her’ or ‘The hat was far too small for her’.
That may seem much too expensive.
You can use rather, slightly, or a bit in front of too.
The dress was rather too small for her.
His hair had grown slightly too long over his ears.
I'm afraid the price may just be a bit too high.
Be careful
Don't use ‘fairly’, ‘quite’, or ‘pretty’ in front of too.
You don't normally use too with an adjective in front of a noun. Don't say, for example, ‘These are too big boots’. You say ‘These boots are too big’.
However, too is sometimes used with an adjective in front of a noun in formal or literary English. A or an is put after the adjective. For example, you can say ‘This is too complex a problem to be dealt with here’. Don't say ‘This is a too complex problem to be dealt with here’.
That's too easy an answer.
Somehow, Vadim seems too nice a man for the job.
used as an intensifier
Some people use too in front of words like kind to say how grateful they are. This is fairly formal.
You're too kind.
However, you don't usually use ‘too’ in front of an adjective or adverb simply to emphasize it. Don't say, for example, ‘I am too pleased with my new car’. The word you use is very.
She was upset and very angry.
Think very carefully.
➜ See very
‘too much’ and ‘too many’
You can use too much with an uncountable noun to say that there is more of something than is needed or wanted.
They said I was earning too much money.
You can also say that there is too little of something.
There would be too little moisture for the plants to grow.
You can use too many with a countable noun to say that there are more people or things than are needed or wanted.
I was making too many mistakes.
You can also say that there are too few people or things.
Too few people nowadays are interested in literature.
You can use much too much or far too much with an uncountable noun to say that there is very much more of something than is necessary or desirable.
This would leave much too much power in the hands of the judges.
These people are getting far too much attention.
You can use far too many with a countable noun to say that there is a much larger number of people or things than is necessary or desirable. Don't say that there are ‘much too many’ of them.
Every middle-class child gets far too many toys.
Be careful
Don't use too much or much too much in front of an adjective which is not followed by a noun. Don't say, for example, ‘It’s too much hot to play football'. Say ‘It’s too hot to play football' or ‘It’s much too hot to play football'.
'too' also found in these entries:
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