start

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈstɑːt/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/stɑrt/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(stärt)

WordReference Collins English Usage © 2020
start - begin
used with noun phrases
If you start or begin something, you do it from a particular time. There is no difference in meaning.
My father started work when he was fourteen.
We'll begin the meeting as soon as he arrives.
The past tense of begin is began. The -ed participle is begun.
The teacher opened the book and began the lesson.
The company has begun research on a new product.
used with other verbs
You can use a to-infinitive or an -ing form after start and begin.
Rafael started to run.
He started laughing.
I was beginning to feel better.
We began talking about our experiences.
Be careful
Don't use an -ing form after starting or beginning. Don't say, for example, ‘I’m beginning understanding more'. You must say ‘I’m beginning to understand more'.
used as intransitive verbs
Start and begin can be intransitive verbs, used to say that something happens from a particular time.
The show starts at 7.
My career as a journalist was about to begin.
special uses of ‘start’
Start has some special meanings. You don't use ‘begin’ with any of these meanings.
You use start to say that someone makes a machine or engine start to work.
She started her car and drove off.
He couldn't get the engine started.
You use start to say that someone creates a business or other organization.
He borrowed money to start a restaurant.
Now is a good time to start your own business.
'start' also found in these entries:
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