ring

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈrɪŋ/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/rɪŋ/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(ring)


Inflections of 'ring' (v): (⇒ conjugate)
rings
v 3rd person singular
ringing
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing."
rang
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed." (For meanings to do with sound or telephones)
ringed
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed." (For meanings to do with encircling or forming circles)
rung
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked." (For meanings to do with sound or telephones)
ringed
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked." (For meanings to do with encircling or forming circles)
WordReference Collins English Usage © 2020
ring - call
‘ring’
In British English, when you ring someone, you dial their phone number and speak to them by phone. The past tense of ring is rang.
I rang Aunt Jane this evening.
The -ed participle is rung.
Have you rung Dad yet?
You can say that someone rings a place.
You must ring the hospital.
In conversation, people often use ring up, instead of ‘ring’. There is no difference in meaning.
He had rung up Emily and told her all about it.
Be careful
Don't use ‘to’ after ring or ring up.
‘call’
American speakers don't usually use ring in this sense. The word they use is call. British speakers also say call.
He promised to call me soon.
➜ See call
'ring' also found in these entries:
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