even

Listen:

UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈiːvən/

US:USA pronuncation: IPAUSA pronuncation: IPA/ˈivən/

US:USA pronunciation: respellingUSA pronunciation: respelling'even': (ēvən); 'Even': (āwən, evən)



Inflections of 'even' (nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc.):
evens
nplplural noun: Noun always used in plural form--for example, "jeans," "scissors." (All usages. Capitalized for the Siberian people.)
Even
nplplural noun: Noun always used in plural form--for example, "jeans," "scissors." (Can be used as a collective plural for the Siberian people—e.g. "Even have inhabited these lands for generations.")
WordReference Collins English Usage © 2020
even
position
You use even to show that what you are saying is surprising. You put even in front of the surprising part of your statement.
Even Anthony enjoyed it.
She liked him even when she was arguing with him.
I shall give the details to no one, not even to you.
However, even usually goes after an auxiliary verb or modal, not in front of it.
You didn't even enjoy it very much.
I couldn't even see the shore.
They may even give you a lift in their van.
used with comparatives
You use even in front of a comparative to emphasize that someone or something has more of a quality than they had before. For example, you say ‘The weather was bad yesterday, but it is even worse today’.
He became even more suspicious of me.
You also use even in front of a comparative to emphasize that someone or something has more of a quality than someone or something else. For example, you say ‘The train is slow, but the bus is even slower’.
Barbara had something even worse to tell me.
The second task was even more difficult.
‘even if’ and ‘even though’
Even if and even though are used to introduce subordinate clauses. You use even if to say that a possible situation would not prevent something from being true.
Even if you disagree with her, she's worth listening to.
I hope I can come back, even if it's only for a few weeks.
Even though has a similar meaning to ‘although’, but is more emphatic.
He went to work even though he was unwell.
I was always afraid of him, even though he was kind to me.
Be careful
If you begin a sentence with even if or even though, don't put ‘yet’ or ‘but’ at the beginning of the main clause. Don't say, for example, ‘Even if you disagree with her, yet she’s worth listening to'.
Be careful
However, you can use still in the main clause. This is a very common use.
Even though the news is six months old, staff are still in shock.
But even if they do change the system, they still face an economic crisis.
'even' also found in these entries:
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