die

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈdaɪ/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/daɪ/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(dī)


Inflections of 'die' (nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc.):
dies
nplplural noun: Noun always used in plural form--for example, "jeans," "scissors." (For tool meanings)
dice
nplplural noun: Noun always used in plural form--for example, "jeans," "scissors." (For cube meaning)
Inflections of 'die' (v): (⇒ conjugate)
dies
v 3rd person singular
dieing
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing." (For tool meanings only)
dying
v pres pverb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing." (All other usages)
died
v pastverb, past simple: Past tense--for example, "He saw the man." "She laughed."
died
v past pverb, past participle: Verb form used descriptively or to form verbs--for example, "the locked door," "The door has been locked."
WordReference Collins English Usage © 2020
die
When a person, animal, or plant dies, they stop living. When a person, animal, or plant is dying, they are so ill or injured that they will not live much longer. The other forms of die are dies, dying, died.
Blake died in January, aged 76.
The elm trees are all dying.
When someone dies as a result of a disease or injury, you can say that they die of the disease or injury or die from it.
An old woman dying of cancer was taken into hospital.
Simon Martin died from brain injuries caused by blows to the head.
Don't use any preposition except of or from after die in sentences like these.
You say that someone dies of hunger or thirst, or dies of natural causes. Don't use ‘die from’.
Millions of children are dying of hunger.
➜ See dead
'die' also found in these entries:
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