car

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UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations/ˈkɑːr/US:USA pronunciation: IPA and respellingUSA pronuncation: IPA/kɑr/ ,USA pronunciation: respelling(kär)


WordReference Collins English Usage © 2020
carriage - car - truck - wagon
‘carriage’
Carriage is one of several nouns which are used to refer to vehicles pulled by railway engines.
In British English, a carriage is one of the separate sections of a train that carries passengers.
The man left his seat by the window and crossed the carriage to where I was sitting.
‘car’
In American English, these sections are called cars.
In British English, car used to be part of the name of some special kinds of railway carriage. For example, a carriage might be called a dining car, a restaurant car, or a sleeping car. These terms are no longer used officially, but people still use them in conversation.
‘truck’ and ‘wagon’
In British English, a truck is an open vehicle used for carrying goods on a railway.
...a long truck loaded with bricks.
In American English, this vehicle is called a freight car or a flatcar.
The train, carrying loaded containers on flatcars, was 1.2 miles long.
...the nation's third-largest railroad freight car maker.
In British English, a wagon is a vehicle with a top, sides and a sliding door, used for carrying goods on a railway.
The pesticides ended up at several sites, almost half of them in railway wagons at Bajza station.
In American English, vehicles like these are usually called boxcars.
A long train of boxcars, its whistle hooting mournfully, rolled into town from the west.
A truck is also a large motor vehicle used for transporting goods by road.
'car' also found in these entries:
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