because

Listen:

UK:*UK and possibly other pronunciationsUK and possibly other pronunciations strong: /bɪˈkəz/, weak: /bɪˈkɒz/

US:USA pronuncation: IPAUSA pronuncation: IPA/bɪˈkɔz, -ˈkʌz/

US:USA pronunciation: respellingUSA pronunciation: respelling(bi kôz, -koz, -kuz)



WordReference Collins English Usage © 2020
because
‘because’
You use because when you are giving the reason for something.
If someone asks a question beginning with ‘Why?’, you can reply using because.
‘Why can’t you come?' – ‘Because I’m too busy.'
You use because with a reason clause when you are explaining a statement.
I couldn't see Elena's expression, because her head was turned.
Because it's an area of outstanding natural beauty, you can't build on it.
Be careful
When you use because at the beginning of a sentence, don't put a phrase such as ‘that is why’ at the beginning of the second clause. Don't say, for example, ‘Because you have been very ill, that is why you will understand how I feel’. You simply say ‘Because you have been very ill, you will understand how I feel’.
‘because of’
You can use because of before a noun phrase when you are giving the reason for something.
Many couples break up because of a lack of money.
Because of the heat, the front door was open.
'because' also found in these entries:
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