also

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 [ˈɔːlsəʊ]


WordReference Collins English Usage © 2019
also - too - as well
You use also, too, or as well when you are giving more information about something.
‘also’
Also is usually used in front of a verb. If there is no auxiliary verb, you put also immediately in front of the verb, unless the verb is be.
I also began to be interested in cricket.
They also helped out.
If the verb is be, you put also after it.
I was also an American.
If there is an auxiliary verb, you put also after the auxiliary verb.
The symptoms of the illness were also described in the book.
If there is more than one auxiliary verb, you put also after the first one.
We'll also be learning about healthy eating.
Also is sometimes put at the beginning of a clause.
She is very intelligent. Also, she is gorgeous.
Be careful
Don't put also at the end of a clause.
‘too’
You usually put too at the end of a clause.
Now the problem affects middle-class children, too.
I'll miss you, and Steve will, too.
In conversation, too is used after a word or phrase when you are making a brief comment on something that has just been said.
‘His father kicked him out of the house.’ – ‘Quite right, too.’
‘They’ve finished mending the road.' – ‘About time, too!’
Too is sometimes put after the first noun phrase in a clause.
I wondered whether I too would become ill.
, Melissa, too, felt miserable.
However, the position of too can make a difference to the meaning of a sentence. ‘I am an American too’ can mean either ‘Like the person just mentioned, I am an American’ or ‘Besides having the other qualities just mentioned, I am an American’. However, ‘I too am an American’ can only mean ‘Like the person just mentioned, I am an American’.
Don't put too at the beginning of a sentence.
➜ For more information, see too
‘as well’
As well always goes at the end of a clause.
Filter coffee is better for your health than instant coffee. And it tastes nicer as well.
They will have a difficult year next year as well.
negatives
You don't usually use ‘also’, ‘too’, or ‘as well’ in negative clauses. Don't say, for example, ‘I’m not hungry and she's not hungry too'. You say ‘I’m not hungry and she's not hungry either', ‘I’m not hungry and neither is she', or ‘I’m not hungry and nor is she'.
Edward wasn't at the ceremony, either.
‘I don’t normally drink coffee in the evening.' – ‘Neither do I.’
➜ See either
➜ See neither
➜ See nor
'also' also found in these entries:
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