all

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 [ˈɔːl]


WordReference Collins English Usage © 2019
all
used as a determiner
You use all immediately in front of the plural form of a noun to talk about every thing or person of a particular kind. When you use all in front of the plural form of a noun, you use a plural form of a verb after it.
There is built-in storage space in all bedrooms.
All boys like to eat.
You can use all immediately in front of an uncountable noun when you are making a general statement about something. When you use all in front of an uncountable noun, you use a singular form of a verb after it.
All research will be done by experts.
All crime is serious.
used with other determiners
If you want to say something about every thing or person in a group, you use all or all of, followed by the, these, those, or a possessive determiner, followed by the plural form of a noun.
Staff are checking all the books to make sure they are suitable.
All my friends came to my wedding.
All of the defendants were proved guilty.
If you want to say something about the whole of a particular thing, you use all or all of, followed by the, this, that, or a possessive determiner, followed by an uncountable noun or the singular form of a countable noun.
They carried all the luggage into the hall.
I want to thank you for all your help.
I lost all of my money.
used in front of pronouns
You can use all or all of in front of the pronouns this, that, these, and those.
Oh dear, what are we going to do about all this?
Maybe all of that is true, but that's not what I asked.
However, in front of personal pronouns you must use all of. Don't use ‘all’.
Listen, all of you.
It would be impossible to list all of it in one programme.
Don't use ‘we’ or ‘they’ after all of. Instead you use us or them.
He discussed it with all of us.
All of them were tired.
used after the subject
All can also be used after the subject of a clause. For example, instead of saying ‘All our friends came’, you can say ‘Our friends all came’.
When there is no auxiliary verb, all goes in front of the verb, unless the verb is be.
We all felt guilty.
If the verb is be, all goes after be.
They were all asleep.
If there is an auxiliary verb, you put all after it.
It will all be over soon.
If there is more than one auxiliary verb, you put all after the first one.
The drawers had all been opened.
All can also come after the direct or indirect object of a verb when this object is a personal pronoun.
We treat them all with care.
I admire you all.
used as a pronoun
All can be a pronoun meaning ‘everything’ or ‘the only thing’. It is often used like this in front of a relative clause.
It was the result of all that had happened previously.
All I remember is his first name.
‘every’
Every has a similar meaning to all. ‘Every teacher was at the meeting’ means the same as ‘All the teachers were at the meeting’.
However, there is a difference between all and every when you use them with expressions of time. For example, if you spend all day doing something, you spend the whole of one day doing it. If you do something every day, you keep doing it each day.
The airport was closed all morning after the accident.
She goes running every morning.
'all' also found in these entries:
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